Australian health psychologist delivers public health lecture

"Dr Peta Stapleton will present practical suggestions for applying Emotional Freedom Techniques (EFT) to areas of life, including weight management, food cravings, obesity, stress and anxiety. One of the benefits of EFT is, once learned, it is easily self-administered, and clients can continue to use EFT on themselves for a range of issues, as and when required. Anyone interested in finding out more is welcome to come along."

Dr Liz Boath, Associate Professor in the School of Social Work, Allied and Public Health at Staffordshire University

Tuesday April 15: A public health lecture which looks at the potential of an emerging self-help method called ‘tapping’ for over-eating takes place at Staffordshire University this week.

Staffordshire University is pioneering research into the potential uses of tapping or Emotional Freedom Technique (EFT) in the UK and has recently published the results of a study carried out with Sandwell Primary Care Trust which found that EFT shows promise as a therapy for conditions such as anxiety and depression.

This week the University is hosting an event by Dr Peta Stapleton,  a registered Clinical and Health Psychologist and Assistant Professor at Bond University in Australia, who pioneered the world's first clinical trial of EFT for food cravings.

This found that six and 12 months after an eight hour treatment program ended, participants' cravings for the food they targeted remained significantly low and after 12-months, a significant decrease in Body Mass Index had been achieved. The results of this study have been published; and a new clinical trial has just concluded which comparing EFT to Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT).

Dr Liz Boath, Associate Professor in the School of Social Work, Allied and Public Health at Staffordshire University, said: "Dr Peta Stapleton will present practical suggestions for applying Emotional Freedom Techniques (EFT) to areas of life, including weight management, food cravings, obesity, stress and anxiety. One of the benefits of EFT is, once learned, it is easily self-administered, and clients can continue to use EFT on themselves for a range of issues, as and when required. Anyone interested in finding out more is welcome to come along."

”We take the view that all new therapies and treatments start with little or no evidence, and further good quality studies into EFT would confirm its effectiveness, safety and potential within the NHS."

The lecture ‘The Emotional Freedom Technique for Weight and Emotional Eating - Overview and Evidence’ takes place at the Science Centre this Thursday from 12.30 noon.

Attendance is free and all are welcome.  To book a place contact Petra Chell at p.chell@staffs.ac.uk or 01785 353707.

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