Forensic and Criminological Psychology

Study options

Award

BSc (Hons)

Key facts

UCAS code:
CMV2
UCAS code:
CMV4
Location:
Stoke-on-Trent campus
Location:
Stoke-on-Trent campus
Location:
Stoke-on-Trent campus
Study option:
Full-time
Study option:
Full-time, with a placement year
Study option:
Part-time
Duration:
3 Years
Duration:
4 Years
Duration:
6 Years
Start date:
25 September 2023

Professional body accreditation

Accredited by the British Psychological Society (BPS)

11th for Student Satisfaction

Complete University Guide 2023 (Psychology)

Outstanding facilities

including Human Sciences Suite, cognitive research cubicles and observation labs

Study the science behind the criminal mind and start exploring the complex thought processes behind the actions, reactions and intentions of offenders within the justice system with our BSc (Hons) Forensic and Criminological Psychology course.

In our BSc (Hons) Forensic and Criminological Psychology course you will be given a firm grounding in key elements of psychology and investigate the theories and principles behind both forensic and criminological psychology, and how these are applied through the UK legal system. This hands-on course is delivered using the equipment and facilities in our outstanding £30m Science Centre, where you will build your expertise in laboratories and with cutting edge facilities like our cognitive research cubicles, observation labs, IT labs and psychophysiological equipment in out Psychology Human Sciences Suite. With Staffordshire University, you’ll be given opportunities to examine methods for collecting and analysing information, to provide the opportunity to apply your knowledge and skills and receive feedback.

Focused on future employability, our course will see you applying forensic and criminological techniques, such as the measurement of physiological responses in interview and video settings. You’ll also get the chance to complete a work placement as part of your studies, which is your opportunity to get real-world experiences in a professional sector, such as the prison service, health, victim support and more.

What’s more, during the course you will get the opportunity to enrich your learning with digital development opportunities and begin to make networks with like-minded students and inspirational guest lectures.

In our BSc (Hons) Forensic and Criminological Psychology course you will be given a firm grounding in key elements of psychology and investigate the theories and principles behind both forensic and criminological psychology, and how these are applied through the UK legal system. This hands-on course is delivered using the equipment and facilities in our outstanding £30m Science Centre, where you will build your expertise in laboratories and with cutting edge facilities like our cognitive research cubicles, observation labs, IT labs and psychophysiological equipment in out Psychology Human Sciences Suite. With Staffordshire University, you’ll be given opportunities to examine methods for collecting and analysing information, to provide the opportunity to apply your knowledge and skills and receive feedback.

Focused on future employability, our course will see you applying forensic and criminological techniques, such as the measurement of physiological responses in interview and video settings. You’ll also get the chance to complete a work placement as part of your studies, which is your opportunity to get real-world experiences in a professional sector, such as the prison service, health, victim support and more.

What’s more, during the course you will get the opportunity to enrich your learning with digital development opportunities and begin to make networks with like-minded students and inspirational guest lectures.

In our BSc (Hons) Forensic and Criminological Psychology course you will be given a firm grounding in key elements of psychology and investigate the theories and principles behind both forensic and criminological psychology, and how these are applied through the UK legal system. This hands-on course is delivered using the equipment and facilities in our outstanding £30m Science Centre, where you will build your expertise in laboratories and with cutting edge facilities like our cognitive research cubicles, observation labs, IT labs and psychophysiological equipment in out Psychology Human Sciences Suite. With Staffordshire University, you’ll be given opportunities to examine methods for collecting and analysing information, to provide the opportunity to apply your knowledge and skills and receive feedback.

Focused on future employability, our course will see you applying forensic and criminological techniques, such as the measurement of physiological responses in interview and video settings. You’ll also get the chance to complete a work placement as part of your studies, which is your opportunity to get real-world experiences in a professional sector, such as the prison service, health, victim support and more.

What’s more, during the course you will get the opportunity to enrich your learning with digital development opportunities and begin to make networks with like-minded students and inspirational guest lectures.

On successful completion of study, we will issue the following award: BSc (Hons) Forensic and Criminological Psychology

On successful completion of study, we will issue the following award: BSc (Hons) Forensic and Criminological Psychology

On successful completion of study, we will issue the following award: BSc (Hons) Forensic and Criminological Psychology

Work placements

Students on all undergraduate Psychology courses at Staffordshire University can opt to undertake a placement (sandwich) year; a structured work experience opportunity which enables you to develop and implement psychology specific and transferable skills whilst getting experience in a professional working environment, in a sector or role that aligns with your own career interests.

Placements take place between Levels 5 and 6 of our undergraduate degrees and last for a period of 9 months, typically from September to June. The Placement Year is an assessed, pass/fail year that would be added to your existing programme of study. The assessment is by written reflection and submission of a placement activity log. Please note that it is the responsibility of the student to secure their own work placement – but we will support you through the selection, application and approval process.

Throughout your placement period you will be supervised by a Workplace Supervisor (usually your line manager) and you and your supervisor will have regular contact with the University through an allocated University Placement Supervisor. Contact with both you and your workplace supervisor may at times be via phone, Teams or Skype, and you will also receive at least one planned visit by your University Placement Supervisor to the workplace towards the beginning of the Placement.

The fee for the placement year will vary depending on the year.

If you choose to undertake a placement as part of your course, you will be able to use it to gain experience in a sector or role that align with your own career interests. Previous placement have included the likes of Academies, the YMCA supporting young people experiencing homelessness, as case workers at the British Red Cross, Mind, fostering services, Asha, as Psychology Support Workers at Midlands Psychology, Staffordshire University Technical Services, research assistantships, ‘Change Grow Live’, mental health and wellbeing clinics.

While some students carry out their placement in a setting close to the University, students do have the flexibility to look for placement opportunities further afield including international opportunities if appropriate and the Psychology Department works with local, regional and national employers alongside international University partners to provide students with placement and work experience opportunities.

Feedback from students who complete the placement year is overwhelmingly positive with many reporting it has helped them prepare for the world of work and helped guide their future career plans.

Course content

Whether you choose to study part-time, full-time or with placement, you’ll get access to the best teaching during your degree.

The course emphasises the application of psychological knowledge to everyday life and experience. We will teach you about the relevance of general psychology and forensic and criminological psychology to a wide range of contemporary issues and you will learn through a mix of lectures, seminars, tutorials, debates and practicals.

As well as subject skills and knowledge, you will develop highly transferrable skills that are valued by employers in communication, problem solving, interpersonal skills, numeracy, teamwork, critical thinking, computing and independent learning.

Modules

Each module is worth a specified number of credits. Our teaching is informed by research, and modules change periodically to reflect developments in the discipline. We aim to ensure that all modules run as scheduled. If for any reason a module cannot be run we will advise you as soon as possible and will provide guidance on selecting an appropriate alternative module.

In Level 4, you’ll be introduced to the main areas of psychology including research methods, as well as psychology in the justice system, and pathways in forensic and criminological psychology.

Level 5 focuses in more depth on developmental and biological perspectives in psychology, where you’ll delve deeper into qualitative and quantitative research methods, and the psychology of crime and serious offending.

At Level 6 you will undertake an empirical research project, social and cognitive perspectives, and forensic applications of psychology. You also have the choice to undertake optional modules art both levels 5 and 6, examples include Psychological Interventions, Cyberpsychology, Research Assistantship, and Behavioural Medicine. A crucial part of becoming a psychologist is learning to understand, conduct, and analyse scientific research. As with all high-quality undergraduate psychology degrees, this means our courses feature modules that focus on teaching these skills. Practical experience with industry-standard SPSS statistics software teaches students to answer a wide variety of research questions by interrogating complex datasets. We take great care in closely guiding students through this learning process (via small group teaching, group work with peers, support clinics and step-by-step guides) supporting our students in preparation for the increasingly data-driven world.

Whether you choose to study part-time, full-time or with placement, you’ll get access to the best teaching during your degree.

The course emphasises the application of psychological knowledge to everyday life and experience. We will teach you about the relevance of general psychology and forensic and criminological psychology to a wide range of contemporary issues and you will learn through a mix of lectures, seminars, tutorials, debates and practicals.

As well as subject skills and knowledge, you will develop highly transferrable skills that are valued by employers in communication, problem solving, interpersonal skills, numeracy, teamwork, critical thinking, computing and independent learning.

Modules

Each module is worth a specified number of credits. Our teaching is informed by research, and modules change periodically to reflect developments in the discipline. We aim to ensure that all modules run as scheduled. If for any reason a module cannot be run we will advise you as soon as possible and will provide guidance on selecting an appropriate alternative module.

In Level 4, you’ll be introduced to the main areas of psychology including research methods, as well as psychology in the justice system, and pathways in forensic and criminological psychology.

Level 5 focuses in more depth on developmental and biological perspectives in psychology, where you’ll delve deeper into qualitative and quantitative research methods, and the psychology of crime and serious offending.

At Level 6 you will undertake an empirical research project, social and cognitive perspectives, and forensic applications of psychology. You also have the choice to undertake optional modules art both levels 5 and 6, examples include Psychological Interventions, Cyberpsychology, Research Assistantship, and Behavioural Medicine. A crucial part of becoming a psychologist is learning to understand, conduct, and analyse scientific research. As with all high-quality undergraduate psychology degrees, this means our courses feature modules that focus on teaching these skills. Practical experience with industry-standard SPSS statistics software teaches students to answer a wide variety of research questions by interrogating complex datasets. We take great care in closely guiding students through this learning process (via small group teaching, group work with peers, support clinics and step-by-step guides) supporting our students in preparation for the increasingly data-driven world.

Whether you choose to study part-time, full-time or with placement, you’ll get access to the best teaching during your degree.

The course emphasises the application of psychological knowledge to everyday life and experience. We will teach you about the relevance of general psychology and forensic and criminological psychology to a wide range of contemporary issues and you will learn through a mix of lectures, seminars, tutorials, debates and practicals.

As well as subject skills and knowledge, you will develop highly transferrable skills that are valued by employers in communication, problem solving, interpersonal skills, numeracy, teamwork, critical thinking, computing and independent learning.

Modules

Each module is worth a specified number of credits. Our teaching is informed by research, and modules change periodically to reflect developments in the discipline. We aim to ensure that all modules run as scheduled. If for any reason a module cannot be run we will advise you as soon as possible and will provide guidance on selecting an appropriate alternative module.

In Level 4, you’ll be introduced to the main areas of psychology including research methods, as well as psychology in the justice system, and pathways in forensic and criminological psychology.

Level 5 focuses in more depth on developmental and biological perspectives in psychology, where you’ll delve deeper into qualitative and quantitative research methods, and the psychology of crime and serious offending.

At Level 6 you will undertake an empirical research project, social and cognitive perspectives, and forensic applications of psychology. You also have the choice to undertake optional modules art both levels 5 and 6, examples include Psychological Interventions, Cyberpsychology, Research Assistantship, and Behavioural Medicine. A crucial part of becoming a psychologist is learning to understand, conduct, and analyse scientific research. As with all high-quality undergraduate psychology degrees, this means our courses feature modules that focus on teaching these skills. Practical experience with industry-standard SPSS statistics software teaches students to answer a wide variety of research questions by interrogating complex datasets. We take great care in closely guiding students through this learning process (via small group teaching, group work with peers, support clinics and step-by-step guides) supporting our students in preparation for the increasingly data-driven world.

Academic year

The course operates on a modular basis that provides flexibility and choice. Typically the majority of modules are 20 or 40 academic credits. Each credit taken equates to a total study time of around 10 hours. Total study time includes scheduled teaching, independent study and assessment activity. Full-time students take modules worth 60 credits per semester, with part-time students taking proportionately fewer credits per semester. All students take a total of 120 credits per level and 360 credits for the degree as a whole. Your overall grade for the course and your degree classification are based on the marks obtained for modules taken at levels 5 and 6. The full-time course has one start point in September.

The course operates on a modular basis that provides flexibility and choice. Typically the majority of modules are 20 or 40 academic credits. Each credit taken equates to a total study time of around 10 hours. Total study time includes scheduled teaching, independent study and assessment activity. Full-time students take modules worth 60 credits per semester, with part-time students taking proportionately fewer credits per semester. All students take a total of 120 credits per level and 360 credits for the degree as a whole. Your overall grade for the course and your degree classification are based on the marks obtained for modules taken at levels 5 and 6. The full-time course has one start point in September.

The course operates on a modular basis that provides flexibility and choice. Typically the majority of modules are 20 or 40 academic credits. Each credit taken equates to a total study time of around 10 hours. Total study time includes scheduled teaching, independent study and assessment activity. Full-time students take modules worth 60 credits per semester, with part-time students taking proportionately fewer credits per semester. All students take a total of 120 credits per level and 360 credits for the degree as a whole. Your overall grade for the course and your degree classification are based on the marks obtained for modules taken at levels 5 and 6. The full-time course has one start point in September.

Professional body accreditation

Accredited against the requirements for the Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership (GBC) of the British Psychological Society (BPS).

The British Psychological Society

Professional body accreditation

Accredited against the requirements for the Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership (GBC) of the British Psychological Society (BPS).

The British Psychological Society

Professional body accreditation

Accredited against the requirements for the Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership (GBC) of the British Psychological Society (BPS).

The British Psychological Society
Psychology Facility Tour

Psychology Facility Tour

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Join Senior Lecturer Nikki for a tour around our state-of-the-art psychology facilities.

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Modules

The tables provide an indicative list of the modules that make up the course for the current academic year. Each module is worth a specified number of credits. Our teaching is informed by research, and modules change periodically to reflect developments in the discipline. We aim to ensure that all modules run as scheduled. If for any reason a module cannot be run we will advise you as soon as possible and will provide guidance on selecting an appropriate alternative module.

Year 3 compulsory modules
Year 3 compulsory modules
Forensic Applications Of Psychology 20 credits
Personalised Psychology Portfolio 20 credits
Psychology Project 40 credits
Society And The Mind 20 credits
Steps To Success 3 N/A
Show 7 optional modules

Modules

The tables provide an indicative list of the modules that make up the course for the current academic year. Each module is worth a specified number of credits. Our teaching is informed by research, and modules change periodically to reflect developments in the discipline. We aim to ensure that all modules run as scheduled. If for any reason a module cannot be run we will advise you as soon as possible and will provide guidance on selecting an appropriate alternative module.

Year 3 compulsory modules
Year 3 compulsory modules
Psychology Placement Year 120 credits
Year 4 compulsory modules
Year 4 compulsory modules
Forensic Applications Of Psychology 20 credits
Personalised Psychology Portfolio 20 credits
Psychology Project 40 credits
Society And The Mind 20 credits
Steps To Success 3 N/A
Show 7 optional modules

Entry requirements

112-120 UCAS Tariff points

  • GCE A Levels - grades BBC or equivalent
  • Pearson BTEC National Extended Diploma - grade DMM
  • Access to HE Diploma - Pass Access with a minimum of 80 UCAS tariff points. Applicants to Staffs who are taking the Access to HE Diploma receive a reduced tariff point offer as part of our access and participation plan activity
  • UAL Level 3 Extended Diploma - grade of Merit overall
  • OCR Cambridge Technical Extended Diploma - grade DMM
  • T Levels - Eligible T Level applications will be asked to achieve a minimum overall grade of P (A*-C) or Higher Pass as a condition of offer

A foundation year is available for applicants who do not have the appropriate entry qualifications for direct entry to the degree level course. The foundation year for this course has a long track record of success in providing a smooth transition to our BSc (Hons) Forensic and Criminological Psychology degree or any one of our other psychology based courses.

112-120 UCAS Tariff points

  • GCE A Levels - grades BBC or equivalent
  • Pearson BTEC National Extended Diploma - grade DMM
  • Access to HE Diploma - Pass Access with a minimum of 80 UCAS tariff points. Applicants to Staffs who are taking the Access to HE Diploma receive a reduced tariff point offer as part of our access and participation plan activity
  • UAL Level 3 Extended Diploma - grade of Merit overall
  • OCR Cambridge Technical Extended Diploma - grade DMM
  • T Levels - Eligible T Level applications will be asked to achieve a minimum overall grade of P (A*-C) or Higher Pass as a condition of offer

A foundation year is available for applicants who do not have the appropriate entry qualifications for direct entry to the degree level course. The foundation year for this course has a long track record of success in providing a smooth transition to our BSc (Hons) Forensic and Criminological Psychology degree or any one of our other psychology based courses.

112-120 UCAS Tariff points

  • GCE A Levels - grades BBC or equivalent
  • Pearson BTEC National Extended Diploma - grade DMM
  • Access to HE Diploma - Pass Access with a minimum of 80 UCAS tariff points. Applicants to Staffs who are taking the Access to HE Diploma receive a reduced tariff point offer as part of our access and participation plan activity
  • UAL Level 3 Extended Diploma - grade of Merit overall
  • OCR Cambridge Technical Extended Diploma - grade DMM
  • T Levels - Eligible T Level applications will be asked to achieve a minimum overall grade of P (A*-C) or Higher Pass as a condition of offer

A foundation year is available for applicants who do not have the appropriate entry qualifications for direct entry to the degree level course. The foundation year for this course has a long track record of success in providing a smooth transition to our BSc (Hons) Forensic and Criminological Psychology degree or any one of our other psychology based courses.

We understand that you might have experienced a challenging run up to higher education and may have not met the entry requirements as listed. If this is the case don’t worry, contact us and our team of expert advisors can guide you through the next stages of application, or help you find the perfect course for your needs.

Discover Psychology at Staffordshire University

Discover Psychology at Staffordshire University

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Dr Claire Barlow explains the key differences between the four undergraduate Psychology degrees at Staffordshire University.

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Facilities

As a student on our psychology courses you will have access to a range of psychology technical laboratories which house equipment such as eye tracking, equipment to record physiological measures (e.g. heart rate), virtual reality, driving simulator, temperature-induced pain stimuli, plus an array of experimental software. This equipment allows us to take scientific measures to underpin theoretical content within psychology.

Throughout your course, you will be introduced to technical equipment as part of your taught sessions. Examples of this could include interactive demonstrations on eye tracking and the Observation Suite, and seminars where students make use of pain inducing stimuli and physiological measures to understand how we can scientifically induce and measure stress.

Additionally, when you conduct your own research project at level 6 you’ll have the opportunity to use the psychology laboratories and equipment to facilitate and enhance your research. Examples of student projects using technical equipment have included:

  • Does induced pain stimuli influence memory of a crime scene?
  • How does the presence of a weapon influence where people look during a crime?

The psychology resources are supported by dedicated psychology technicians who will deliver technical sessions and will train and support you in your use of the resources.

Careers

Graduates from our Psychology degrees have become:

  • Assistant psychologists (earning potential £22,000 - £44,000)
  • Senior family support workers (earning potential £24,000 - £35,000)
  • Research assistants (earning potential £24,000 - £40,000)
  • Psychology support worker (earning potential £20,000 - £28,000)

Many have completed further professional training to become:

  • Teachers (earning potential £23,000 - £37,000)
  • Social workers (earning potential £24,000 - £40,000)
  • Clinical psychologists (earning potential £40,000 - £60,000)
  • Educational psychologists (earning potential £37,000 - £55,000)
  • Counselling psychologists (earning potential £37,000 - £50,000)
  • Health psychologists (earning potential £37,000 - £55,000)

After completing the BSc (Hons) Forensic and Criminological Psychology course you will be ideally placed for further study at postgraduate level.

Students on our psychology courses are supported to find voluntary positions in which they contribute to important roles within not-for-profit organisations, working to support people experiencing homelessness, mental health difficulties, and drugs and alcohol challenges.

Students have volunteered for various organisations including Girlguiding UK, Oxfam, Change, Grow, Live (a children’s rights service) and Catch 22 (an organisation supporting victims of child sexual abuse and children missing from home). Many students have also engaged in voluntary work with education providers, supporting children and young people in schools and nurseries around Stoke-On-Trent and the surrounding areas.

Our students find voluntary work experience to be a particularly enjoyable aspect of their studies as they can give back to their communities whilst simultaneously gaining valuable work experience.

You can find out further information about our graduates on our InPsych Blog and Graduate Stories page.

All students have access to Career Connect, our dedicated careers team.

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Teaching and assessment

Teaching

Students learn in different ways. To help everyone get the most out of their studies, we teach students through a blend of lectures, seminars, workshops, journal clubs and laboratory practicals. Seminars enable you to discuss and develop your understanding of topics covered in lectures in smaller groups of around 18-20 students. In addition, you will have timetabled meetings with your academic mentor. You will be taught in first-class learning spaces throughout your course.

Students learn in different ways. To help everyone get the most out of their studies, we teach students through a blend of lectures, seminars, workshops, journal clubs and laboratory practicals. Seminars enable you to discuss and develop your understanding of topics covered in lectures in smaller groups of around 18-20 students. In addition, you will have timetabled meetings with your academic mentor. You will be taught in first-class learning spaces throughout your course.

Students learn in different ways. To help everyone get the most out of their studies, we teach students through a blend of lectures, seminars, workshops, journal clubs and laboratory practicals. Seminars enable you to discuss and develop your understanding of topics covered in lectures in smaller groups of around 18-20 students. In addition, you will have timetabled meetings with your academic mentor. You will be taught in first-class learning spaces throughout your course.

Assessment

Your course will provide you with opportunities to test your understanding of your subject informally before you complete the formal assessments that count towards your final mark. Each module normally includes practice or ‘formative’ assessments, for which you receive feedback from your tutor. Practice assessments are developmental and any grades you receive for them do not count towards your module mark. There is a formal or ‘summative’ assessment at the end of each module. This includes a range of coursework assessments, such as essays, reports, case studies, portfolios, presentations, advisory briefs, final year independent project and multiple choice and written examinations. The grades from formal assessments count towards your module mark.

Your course will provide you with opportunities to test your understanding of your subject informally before you complete the formal assessments that count towards your final mark. Each module normally includes practice or ‘formative’ assessments, for which you receive feedback from your tutor. Practice assessments are developmental and any grades you receive for them do not count towards your module mark. There is a formal or ‘summative’ assessment at the end of each module. This includes a range of coursework assessments, such as essays, reports, case studies, portfolios, presentations, advisory briefs, final year independent project and multiple choice and written examinations. The grades from formal assessments count towards your module mark.

Your course will provide you with opportunities to test your understanding of your subject informally before you complete the formal assessments that count towards your final mark. Each module normally includes practice or ‘formative’ assessments, for which you receive feedback from your tutor. Practice assessments are developmental and any grades you receive for them do not count towards your module mark. There is a formal or ‘summative’ assessment at the end of each module. This includes a range of coursework assessments, such as essays, reports, case studies, portfolios, presentations, advisory briefs, final year independent project and multiple choice and written examinations. The grades from formal assessments count towards your module mark.

Learning support

In addition to the excellent support you will receive from your course teaching team, our central Academic Skills team provides group and one-to-one help to support your learning in a number of areas. These include study skills (including reading, note-taking and presentation skills); written English (including punctuation and grammatical accuracy); academic writing (including how to reference); research skills; critical thinking and understanding arguments; and revision, assessment and examination skills (including time management).

Additional support

Our Student Inclusion Services support students with additional needs such as sensory impairment or learning challenges such as dyslexia.

Feedback

You will normally receive feedback on coursework assessments within 20 working days following the date of submission. Examination feedback may take a variety of formats. However, as a minimum, generic feedback will be made available to all students who take written examinations.

You will normally receive feedback on coursework assessments within 20 working days following the date of submission. Examination feedback may take a variety of formats. However, as a minimum, generic feedback will be made available to all students who take written examinations.

You will normally receive feedback on coursework assessments within 20 working days following the date of submission. Examination feedback may take a variety of formats. However, as a minimum, generic feedback will be made available to all students who take written examinations.

Year 1

18% of time in lectures, seminars or similar
82% of time in independent study
0% of time in placements

Year 2

21% of time in lectures, seminars or similar
79% of time in independent study
0% of time in placements

Year 3

14% of time in lectures, seminars or similar
86% of time in independent study
0% of time in placements

Independent learning

When not attending lectures, seminars, laboratory or other timetabled sessions, you will be expected to continue learning independently through self-study. Typically, this will involve utilising a range of digital resources including our virtual learning environment; reading journals, articles and books; working on individual and group projects; undertaking research in the library; preparing coursework assignments and presentations, and preparing for examinations. Your independent learning will be supported by a range of excellent facilities. These include the library, open access computer facilities, informal learning zones and a range of laboratories.

When not attending lectures, seminars, laboratory or other timetabled sessions, you will be expected to continue learning independently through self-study. Typically, this will involve utilising a range of digital resources including our virtual learning environment; reading journals, articles and books; working on individual and group projects; undertaking research in the library; preparing coursework assignments and presentations, and preparing for examinations. Your independent learning will be supported by a range of excellent facilities. These include the library, open access computer facilities, informal learning zones and a range of laboratories.

When not attending lectures, seminars, laboratory or other timetabled sessions, you will be expected to continue learning independently through self-study. Typically, this will involve utilising a range of digital resources including our virtual learning environment; reading journals, articles and books; working on individual and group projects; undertaking research in the library; preparing coursework assignments and presentations, and preparing for examinations. Your independent learning will be supported by a range of excellent facilities. These include the library, open access computer facilities, informal learning zones and a range of laboratories.

Year 1

0% practical assessments
60% coursework
40% written exams

Year 2

17% practical assessments
67% coursework
17% written exams

Year 3

5% practical assessments
95% coursework
0% written exams

Staff

Mel Hall

Lecturer

Mel's research interests include legal and criminological psychology and the impact of psychology in E-learning and the web. She is module leader for 'People Behaving Badly', 'The Psychology of Crime', 'Psychological Contexts of Crime and Punish…

Mel's profile

Dr Sarah Krahenbuhl

Senior Lecturer

Sarah's area of expertise is in investigative interviewing strategies used with children and subsequent legal proceedings. She is module leader for Forensic Applications of Psychology.

Sarah's profile

Fees

For the course starting on 25 September 2023 the tuition fees are:

Tuition fees for BSc (Hons)-Full-time
Study option UK / Channel Islands International
Full-time £9,250 per year of study £16,750 per year of study

For the course starting on 25 September 2023 the tuition fees are:

Tuition fees for BSc (Hons) Full-time, with a placement year
Study option UK / Channel Islands
Full-time To be confirmed

For the course starting on 25 September 2023 the tuition fees are:

Tuition fees for BSc (Hons) Part-time
Study option UK / Channel Islands
Part-time £4,620 per year of study

UK and Channel Island students: This tuition fee is agreed subject to UK government policy and parliamentary regulation. If the UK government passes appropriate legislation, the fee for subsequent years of study may increase in each academic year. But this increase will not exceed the rate of inflation as measured by RPIX**. Any change in fees will apply to both new and continuing students. The University will notify students of any change as early as possible. Further information about fee changes would be posted on the University’s website once this becomes available.

**RPIX is a measure of inflation equivalent to all the items in the Retail Price Index (RPI) excluding mortgage interest payments.

International students: Tuition fees will remain the same for each year of your course, as long as you complete it in the normal time-frame (i.e. no repeat years or breaks in study).

Included in tuition fees
Included in the fees:

DBS checks where required for compulsory modules.

Compulsory field trips.

DBS checks where required for compulsory modules.

Compulsory field trips.

DBS checks where required for compulsory modules.

Compulsory field trips.

Not included in tuition fees
Not included in the fees:

Optional field trips

Optional field trips

Optional field trips

Accommodation and living costs
Accommodation and living costs

Accommodation and living costs are not included in our fees. 

For more information on accommodation and living costs, please see: Accommodation

Sources of financial support

If you receive funding from Student Finance you may be eligible to apply for additional benefits. Details can be obtained by visiting: www.gov.uk

Scholarships and additional funding

As an undergraduate student at Staffordshire, you may be eligible for additional financial support through one of our scholarships and bursaries. You can visit our funding page to find out more and check your eligibility.

Scholarships and additional funding

As an undergraduate student at Staffordshire, you may be eligible for additional financial support through one of our scholarships and bursaries. You can visit our funding page to find out more and check your eligibility.

Scholarships and additional funding

As an undergraduate student at Staffordshire, you may be eligible for additional financial support through one of our scholarships and bursaries. You can visit our funding page to find out more and check your eligibility.

Apply

Location Award Study option Start date Apply Link
Stoke-on-Trent campus BSc (Hons) Full-time 25 September 2023 Apply now

Rules and regulations

If you are offered a place at Staffordshire University, your offer will be subject to our rules, regulations and enrolment conditions, which may vary from time to time.

Students of Staffordshire University enter into a contract with us and are bound by these rules and regulations, which are subject to change. For more information, please see: University Policies and Regulations.

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Part-time
Placement year
UK University

StudentCrowd University Awards 2022

for Job Prospects

StudentCrowd University Awards 2022

for Student Satisfaction

Complete University Guide 2022

for Social Inclusion

The Times and The Sunday Times Good University Guide 2023

for Course Content

StudentCrowd University Awards 2022

of Research Impact is ‘Outstanding’ or ‘Very Considerable’

Research Excellence Framework 2021