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Psychology Eye Tracking

Eye tracking allows us to track where people are focusing and paying attention visually, which can be useful to understand human behaviour across many areas of Psychology.

This facility houses an EyeLink 1000 and an EyeLink 1000 Plus eye tracker which track people’s visual attention and focus, which in turn allows us to explore factors that can affect human behaviour and decision making.

Participants are seated in front of the eye tracker and presented stimuli on the screen in front of them. These stimuli can be created for many different types of experiments and research interests, and many different responses to these stimuli can be recorded in addition to the eye tracking data, for example: keyboard or mouse responses, reaction times etc. The EyeLink 1000 and EyeLink 1000 Plus can also be used alongside other pieces of equipment in psychology, for example sending signals to the BioPac to allow us to record physiological responses alongside the eye tracking data.

Whilst an experiment is taking place, the researcher can control the experiment from the control room. This control room contains monitors to view and control the participant’s screen and the eye tracker. There is also a CCTV and communication system in place so that the researcher can see and speak to the participant throughout.

In addition to the EyeLink eye trackers, there are also other eye tracking options available, such as the Eye Tribe eye tracker, and Tobii eye tracking glasses that can be used outside of the laboratory. Eye tracking can also be integrated into Virtual Reality headsets, such as the Samsung Gear and HTC Vive systems that are available within the Psychology Department.

Equipment

Staff

Photo of Psychology Eye Tracking