Humanitarian Archaeology *

Study options

Award

BSc (Hons)

Key facts

UCAS code:
VV17
UCAS code:
VV18
Location:
Stoke-on-Trent campus
Location:
Stoke-on-Trent campus
Location:
Stoke-on-Trent campus
Study option:
Full-time
Study option:
Full-time, with a placement year
Study option:
Part-time
Duration:
3 Years
Duration:
4 Years
Duration:
6 Years
Start date:
25 September 2023

World Leading Expertise

On the first Humanitarian Archaeology degree in the world, you will learn from staff who are pioneers in their fields

Unique Fieldwork opportunities

Gain real-world experience during UK and International residential summer schools

Make a difference

Opportunities to assist in ongoing missing persons investigations as part of our Cold Case Unit or through our Genocide Investigation team

* This course is subject to validation

How can understanding the past and the present help us shape our future? What role will you play in responding to the numerous environmental, political, and social challenges of our time? Develop your skills as an active Global Citizen with our BSc Humanitarian Archaeology.

Develop your skills as an active global citizen with our BSc Humanitarian Archaeology.

This cutting-edge, practical degree will enable you to become an archaeologist with the skills to tackle some of the biggest humanitarian issues affecting global society in the 21st century. You will explore how conflict, genocide, human evolution, identity, and climate change have shaped the world in which we live and how society has responded to these challenges throughout human history.

You will participate in unique fieldwork opportunities throughout your studies that will teach you the practical and digital skills that archaeologists use to document landscapes and analyse material culture. You will learn how to assist in social action agendas, build community cohesion, and contribute to the physical and mental well-being of others using archaeological approaches.

The BSc (Hons) Humanitarian Archaeology is a unique and diverse programme which offers you the opportunity to:

  • gain detailed knowledge about how conflict, genocide, climate change and culture have shaped societies and the environment
  • learn about the methods that archaeologists use to document landscapes and material culture, advance social action and contribute to physical and mental well-being
  • develop and apply practical skills during annual fieldwork opportunities, including international fieldwork in your second year
  • tailor your learning through optional modules in years 2 and 3
  • complete a detailed research project relating to one of your pathway choices and/or interests
  • undertake interdisciplinary studies taught by specialists in Archaeology, History, International Relations, Geography, Media and Film, Forensic Science, and Law.

This course is ideal for those who have an interest in archaeological practice, human rights, genocide and conflict studies, social justice, forensic investigation, and geography.
You will engage with the many of the critical debates that currently affect our global community such as:

  • The complexity of human identity from prehistory to the present
  • Evidence for the current climate crisis
  • The reasoning, methods, and aftermaths of conflict; ranging from interpersonal violence to acts of genocide
  • You will also develop the skills needed to communicate with a range of stakeholders, including the public and critical decision-makers

In Year 2 there will be a substantive overseas field school to Africa or the Global South region where you will engage with communities and individuals who are at the forefront of adapting to the climate crisis, conflict, or other humanitarian concerns. We will help you develop an understanding of how learning about the past can help shape the future, and equip you with the skills you need to pursue a career in a wide range of fields, including archaeology, human rights work, Non-Government Agencies, education, policy development, and heritage management.

Develop your skills as an active global citizen with our BSc Humanitarian Archaeology.

This cutting-edge, practical degree will enable you to become an archaeologist with the skills to tackle some of the biggest humanitarian issues affecting global society in the 21st century. You will explore how conflict, genocide, human evolution, identity, and climate change have shaped the world in which we live and how society has responded to these challenges throughout human history.

You will participate in unique fieldwork opportunities throughout your studies that will teach you the practical and digital skills that archaeologists use to document landscapes and analyse material culture. You will learn how to assist in social action agendas, build community cohesion, and contribute to the physical and mental well-being of others using archaeological approaches.

The BSc (Hons) Humanitarian Archaeology is a unique and diverse programme which offers you the opportunity to:

  • gain detailed knowledge about how conflict, genocide, climate change and culture have shaped societies and the environment
  • learn about the methods that archaeologists use to document landscapes and material culture, advance social action and contribute to physical and mental well-being
  • develop and apply practical skills during annual fieldwork opportunities, including international fieldwork in your second year
  • tailor your learning through optional modules in years 2 and 3
  • complete a detailed research project relating to one of your pathway choices and/or interests
  • undertake interdisciplinary studies taught by specialists in Archaeology, History, International Relations, Geography, Media and Film, Forensic Science, and Law.

This course is ideal for those who have an interest in archaeological practice, human rights, genocide and conflict studies, social justice, forensic investigation, and geography.
You will engage with the many of the critical debates that currently affect our global community such as:

  • The complexity of human identity from prehistory to the present
  • Evidence for the current climate crisis
  • The reasoning, methods, and aftermaths of conflict; ranging from interpersonal violence to acts of genocide
  • You will also develop the skills needed to communicate with a range of stakeholders, including the public and critical decision-makers

In Year 2 there will be a substantive overseas field school to Africa or the Global South region where you will engage with communities and individuals who are at the forefront of adapting to the climate crisis, conflict, or other humanitarian concerns. We will help you develop an understanding of how learning about the past can help shape the future, and equip you with the skills you need to pursue a career in a wide range of fields, including archaeology, human rights work, Non-Government Agencies, education, policy development, and heritage management.

Develop your skills as an active global citizen with our BSc Humanitarian Archaeology.

This cutting-edge, practical degree will enable you to become an archaeologist with the skills to tackle some of the biggest humanitarian issues affecting global society in the 21st century. You will explore how conflict, genocide, human evolution, identity, and climate change have shaped the world in which we live and how society has responded to these challenges throughout human history.

You will participate in unique fieldwork opportunities throughout your studies that will teach you the practical and digital skills that archaeologists use to document landscapes and analyse material culture. You will learn how to assist in social action agendas, build community cohesion, and contribute to the physical and mental well-being of others using archaeological approaches.

The BSc (Hons) Humanitarian Archaeology is a unique and diverse programme which offers you the opportunity to:

  • gain detailed knowledge about how conflict, genocide, climate change and culture have shaped societies and the environment
  • learn about the methods that archaeologists use to document landscapes and material culture, advance social action and contribute to physical and mental well-being
  • develop and apply practical skills during annual fieldwork opportunities, including international fieldwork in your second year
  • tailor your learning through optional modules in years 2 and 3
  • complete a detailed research project relating to one of your pathway choices and/or interests
  • undertake interdisciplinary studies taught by specialists in Archaeology, History, International Relations, Geography, Media and Film, Forensic Science, and Law.

This course is ideal for those who have an interest in archaeological practice, human rights, genocide and conflict studies, social justice, forensic investigation, and geography.
You will engage with the many of the critical debates that currently affect our global community such as:

  • The complexity of human identity from prehistory to the present
  • Evidence for the current climate crisis
  • The reasoning, methods, and aftermaths of conflict; ranging from interpersonal violence to acts of genocide
  • You will also develop the skills needed to communicate with a range of stakeholders, including the public and critical decision-makers

In Year 2 there will be a substantive overseas field school to Africa or the Global South region where you will engage with communities and individuals who are at the forefront of adapting to the climate crisis, conflict, or other humanitarian concerns. We will help you develop an understanding of how learning about the past can help shape the future, and equip you with the skills you need to pursue a career in a wide range of fields, including archaeology, human rights work, Non-Government Agencies, education, policy development, and heritage management.

On successful completion of study, we will issue the following award: BSc (Hons) Humanitarian Archaeology

On successful completion of study, we will issue the following award: BSc (Hons) Humanitarian Archaeology

On successful completion of study, we will issue the following award: BSc (Hons) Humanitarian Archaeology

Work placements

Also available with a work placement opportunity in between second and third year of study for full-time students.

Placement locations will be varied and dependent on availability. They can, for example, be located on campus by working for the Centre of Archaeology or the Cold Case Unit. They could also be undertaken elsewhere in the UK and internationally by arrangement (subject to funding)

Placement locations will be varied and dependent on availability. They can, for example, be located on campus by working for the Centre of Archaeology or the Cold Case Unit. They could also be undertaken elsewhere in the UK and internationally by arrangement (subject to funding)

Placement locations will be varied and dependent on availability. They can, for example, be located on campus by working for the Centre of Archaeology or the Cold Case Unit. They could also be undertaken elsewhere in the UK and internationally by arrangement (subject to funding)

Course content

LEVEL 4: Introductory modules on topics such as Humanitarian Archaeology, Climate and Environment, the Archaeology of Conflict, Archaeological Practice, and Identity. Each module will be 20 credits, intended to introduce you to the topic and begin to develop your practical and digital skillsets. The final module at Level 4 is an Archaeological Field School.

LEVEL 5: Continuing your journey, you will complete modules on Contemporary Debates in Humanitarian Archaeology, Community Archaeology, and Forensic Archaeology. These modules will be complemented by one optional module of your choice and a Research Skills module that will teach you the nature of research including hypothesis development, statistics, and report writing;. The final module at Level 5 is the International Residential Summer School. Each module will be 20 credits.

LEVEL 6: You will take advanced modules in Digital Archaeology, Mass Death Scenarios, and Archaeology and Activism followed by one option module and your Dissertation. Each module will be 20 credits, with the Dissertation being 40 credits.

Core modules across the course will enable you to:
• Study the wide range of humanitarian concerns that 21st century societies will face, and the factors that connect them
• Explore ethical issues and challenges with archaeological investigations
• Learn about and utilise cutting edge methods that can be used to document sites and record evidence associated with the investigation of climate change, conflict and mass violence, and identity.
• Put field skills into practice in simulated and real-world scenarios and during field schools
• Adopt an interdiscplinary approach to archaeological investigation

LEVEL 4: Introductory modules on topics such as Humanitarian Archaeology, Climate and Environment, the Archaeology of Conflict, Archaeological Practice, and Identity. Each module will be 20 credits, intended to introduce you to the topic and begin to develop your practical and digital skillsets. The final module at Level 4 is an Archaeological Field School.

LEVEL 5: Continuing your journey, you will complete modules on Contemporary Debates in Humanitarian Archaeology, Community Archaeology, and Forensic Archaeology. These modules will be complemented by one optional module of your choice and a Research Skills module that will teach you the nature of research including hypothesis development, statistics, and report writing;. The final module at Level 5 is the International Residential Summer School. Each module will be 20 credits.

LEVEL 6: You will take advanced modules in Digital Archaeology, Mass Death Scenarios, and Archaeology and Activism followed by one option module and your Dissertation. Each module will be 20 credits, with the Dissertation being 40 credits.

Core modules across the course will enable you to:
• Study the wide range of humanitarian concerns that 21st century societies will face, and the factors that connect them
• Explore ethical issues and challenges with archaeological investigations
• Learn about and utilise cutting edge methods that can be used to document sites and record evidence associated with the investigation of climate change, conflict and mass violence, and identity.
• Put field skills into practice in simulated and real-world scenarios and during field schools
• Adopt an interdiscplinary approach to archaeological investigation

LEVEL 4: Introductory modules on topics such as Humanitarian Archaeology, Climate and Environment, the Archaeology of Conflict, Archaeological Practice, and Identity. Each module will be 20 credits, intended to introduce you to the topic and begin to develop your practical and digital skillsets. The final module at Level 4 is an Archaeological Field School.

LEVEL 5: Continuing your journey, you will complete modules on Contemporary Debates in Humanitarian Archaeology, Community Archaeology, and Forensic Archaeology. These modules will be complemented by one optional module of your choice and a Research Skills module that will teach you the nature of research including hypothesis development, statistics, and report writing;. The final module at Level 5 is the International Residential Summer School. Each module will be 20 credits.

LEVEL 6: You will take advanced modules in Digital Archaeology, Mass Death Scenarios, and Archaeology and Activism followed by one option module and your Dissertation. Each module will be 20 credits, with the Dissertation being 40 credits.

Core modules across the course will enable you to:
• Study the wide range of humanitarian concerns that 21st century societies will face, and the factors that connect them
• Explore ethical issues and challenges with archaeological investigations
• Learn about and utilise cutting edge methods that can be used to document sites and record evidence associated with the investigation of climate change, conflict and mass violence, and identity.
• Put field skills into practice in simulated and real-world scenarios and during field schools
• Adopt an interdiscplinary approach to archaeological investigation

What is our Humanitarian Archaeology course all about?

What is our Humanitarian Archaeology course all about?

Video

Learn more about how our cutting-edge Humanitarian Archaeology course will give you the skills to use Archaeology techniques to help solve the problems of today.

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Entry requirements

Typical UCAS offer: 112-120 points

Typical UCAS offer: 112-120 points

Typical UCAS offer: 112-120 points

We understand that you might have experienced a challenging run up to higher education and may have not met the entry requirements as listed. If this is the case don’t worry, contact us and our team of expert advisors can guide you through the next stages of application, or help you find the perfect course for your needs.

Humanitarian Archaeology Staff Expertise

Humanitarian Archaeology Staff Expertise

Video

Caroline Sturdy Colls talks about staff and their expertise.

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For equivalent entry requirements in your home country, please see the information on our country pages.

Choose your country

Check our entry and English language requirements for your country.

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Facilities

Careers

After completing the BSc (Hons) Humanitarian Archaeology, you'll be equipped with transferrable skills that will be desirable to employers. These can be adapted to a range of professions including:

  • Archaeology
  • Forensic Investigation
  • Human Rights Work
  • Environmental Work
  • Law Enforcement
  • The Civil Service
  • Armed Forces and Security Services
  • Consultancy
  • Charity Work
  • Education and Teaching

Eager for more knowledge? Upon completion, you will be ideally placed for further academic study at postgraduate level with our MSc/MA Forensic Archaeology and Genocide Investigation programme.

All students have access to Career Connect, our dedicated careers team.

Humanitarian Archaeology Careers

Humanitarian Archaeology Careers

Video

Will Mitchell talks about the sort of careers students of the course may go on to.

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Teaching and assessment

Teaching

Taught by staff who are considered pioneers in conflict and genocide archaeology, experts in climate change, and archaeological-anthropological investigation. Sessions will be a mixture of lectures, workshops, seminars, and lab-based practicals. Discussion and debate will be encouraged throughout. Core modules are targeted towards practical skills and their application using state-of-the-art equipment across campus and on various fieldwork sites. Two residential fieldwork modules will be part of the course, one domestic and one international.

Taught by staff who are considered pioneers in conflict and genocide archaeology, experts in climate change, and archaeological-anthropological investigation. Sessions will be a mixture of lectures, workshops, seminars, and lab-based practicals. Discussion and debate will be encouraged throughout. Core modules are targeted towards practical skills and their application using state-of-the-art equipment across campus and on various fieldwork sites. Two residential fieldwork modules will be part of the course, one domestic and one international.

Taught by staff who are considered pioneers in conflict and genocide archaeology, experts in climate change, and archaeological-anthropological investigation. Sessions will be a mixture of lectures, workshops, seminars, and lab-based practicals. Discussion and debate will be encouraged throughout. Core modules are targeted towards practical skills and their application using state-of-the-art equipment across campus and on various fieldwork sites. Two residential fieldwork modules will be part of the course, one domestic and one international.

Assessment

Assessments for the core modules will include, but not limited to, the following:

  • Poster Presentations
  • Written Assessments (Essays)
  • Written Assessments (Reports)
  • Practical Examinations and Reflections
  • Digital Assessments
  • Dissertation

Assessments for the core modules will include, but not limited to, the following:

  • Poster Presentations
  • Written Assessments (Essays)
  • Written Assessments (Reports)
  • Practical Examinations and Reflections
  • Digital Assessments
  • Dissertation

Assessments for the core modules will include, but not limited to, the following:

  • Poster Presentations
  • Written Assessments (Essays)
  • Written Assessments (Reports)
  • Practical Examinations and Reflections
  • Digital Assessments
  • Dissertation

Learning support

In addition to the excellent support you will receive from your course teaching team, our central Academic Skills team provides group and one-to-one help to support your learning in a number of areas. These include study skills (including reading, note-taking and presentation skills); written English (including punctuation and grammatical accuracy); academic writing (including how to reference); research skills; critical thinking and understanding arguments; and revision, assessment and examination skills (including time management).

Additional support

Student support will be tailored to students' LSS agreements. Alternatives to field school module will be offered where students are unable to attend due to a disability.

Our Student Inclusion Services support students with additional needs such as sensory impairment, or learning difficulties such as dyslexia.

Feedback

You will normally receive feedback on coursework assessments within 20 working days following the date of submission. Examination feedback may take a variety of formats. However, as a minimum, generic feedback will be made available to all students who take written examinations.

You will normally receive feedback on coursework assessments within 20 working days following the date of submission. Examination feedback may take a variety of formats. However, as a minimum, generic feedback will be made available to all students who take written examinations.

You will normally receive feedback on coursework assessments within 20 working days following the date of submission. Examination feedback may take a variety of formats. However, as a minimum, generic feedback will be made available to all students who take written examinations.

Humanitarian Archaeology Course Facilities

Humanitarian Archaeology Course Facilities

Video

Kevin Colls discusses some of the facilities that students on the course will get the opportunity to use.

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Your study time will consist of class contact hours, self-directed learning, assessment and placements where appropriate. Your actual contact hours will depend the pathways you choose, on the optional modules you select and professional body requirements.

When not attending lectures, seminars, laboratory or timetabled sessions, you will be expected to continue learning independently through self-study. Typically, this will involve utilising a range of digital resources including our virtual learning environment; reading journals, articles and books; working on individual and group projects; undertaking research in the library; preparing coursework assignments and presentations; and preparing for examinations. Your independent learning will be supported by a range of excellent facilities. These include the library, open access computer facilities, informal learning zones, a range of laboratories and performance and studio spaces.

Your study time will consist of class contact hours, self-directed learning, assessment and placements where appropriate. Your actual contact hours will depend the pathways you choose, on the optional modules you select and professional body requirements.

When not attending lectures, seminars, laboratory or timetabled sessions, you will be expected to continue learning independently through self-study. Typically, this will involve utilising a range of digital resources including our virtual learning environment; reading journals, articles and books; working on individual and group projects; undertaking research in the library; preparing coursework assignments and presentations; and preparing for examinations. Your independent learning will be supported by a range of excellent facilities. These include the library, open access computer facilities, informal learning zones, a range of laboratories and performance and studio spaces.

Your study time will consist of class contact hours, self-directed learning, assessment and placements where appropriate. Your actual contact hours will depend the pathways you choose, on the optional modules you select and professional body requirements.

When not attending lectures, seminars, laboratory or timetabled sessions, you will be expected to continue learning independently through self-study. Typically, this will involve utilising a range of digital resources including our virtual learning environment; reading journals, articles and books; working on individual and group projects; undertaking research in the library; preparing coursework assignments and presentations; and preparing for examinations. Your independent learning will be supported by a range of excellent facilities. These include the library, open access computer facilities, informal learning zones, a range of laboratories and performance and studio spaces.

Independent learning

Independent learning will consist of researching specific topics, case studies, and sites for discussion/assessment during seminars and workshops, as well as preparation for practical exercises and the dissertation.

Independent learning will consist of researching specific topics, case studies, and sites for discussion/assessment during seminars and workshops, as well as preparation for practical exercises and the dissertation.

Independent learning will consist of researching specific topics, case studies, and sites for discussion/assessment during seminars and workshops, as well as preparation for practical exercises and the dissertation.

Staff

You will be taught by an world-leading team whose expertise and knowledge are closely matched to the content of the modules on the course. The team includes senior academics and professional practitioners with industry and consulting experience in archaeology. Postgraduate research students who have undertaken teaching training may also contribute to the teaching of seminars under the supervision of the module leader.

Your tutors are experienced practitioners who will bring real-life experience to your learning using the most up-to-date skills and technologies.

Professor Caroline Sturdy Colls

Professor Of Conflict Archaeology

Prof. Sturdy Colls' pioneering research focuses on the application of interdisciplinary approaches to the investigation of Holocaust landscapes. Caroline is the Course Leader for the Forensic Archaeology masters.

Caroline's profile

Kevin Colls

Associate Professor

Kevin has directed and published archaeological projects throughout the United Kingdom and Europe and holds over 20 years' experience in research and professional archaeology.

Kevin's profile

William Mitchell

Lecturer

William has worked on a number of forensic research projects throughout Europe, including sites of the Holocaust in Germany, Ukraine and Poland. Using non-invasive geophysical techniques, he has developed his specialism in the search and recover…

William's profile

Fees

For the course starting on 25 September 2023 the tuition fees are:

Tuition fees for BSc (Hons)-Full-time
Study option UK / Channel Islands International
Full-time £9,250 per year of study £16,750 per year of study

For the course starting on 25 September 2023 the tuition fees are:

Tuition fees for BSc (Hons) Full-time, with a placement year
Study option UK / Channel Islands International
Full-time £9,250 per year of study £16,750 per year of study

For the course starting on 25 September 2023 the tuition fees are:

Tuition fees for BSc (Hons) Part-time
Study option UK / Channel Islands
Part-time £4,620 per year of study

UK and Channel Island students: This tuition fee is agreed subject to UK government policy and parliamentary regulation. If the UK government passes appropriate legislation, the fee for subsequent years of study may increase in each academic year. But this increase will not exceed the rate of inflation as measured by RPIX**. Any change in fees will apply to both new and continuing students. The University will notify students of any change as early as possible. Further information about fee changes would be posted on the University’s website once this becomes available.

**RPIX is a measure of inflation equivalent to all the items in the Retail Price Index (RPI) excluding mortgage interest payments.

International students: Tuition fees will remain the same for each year of your course, as long as you complete it in the normal time-frame (i.e. no repeat years or breaks in study).

Included in tuition fees
Included in the fees:

Fees include the costs to participate in two fieldwork modules, one in the UK and another internationally. Duration 5 to 10 days.

Fees include the costs to participate in two fieldwork modules, one in the UK and another internationally. Duration 5 to 10 days.

Fees include the costs to participate in two fieldwork modules, one in the UK and another internationally. Duration 5 to 10 days.

Accommodation and living costs
Accommodation and living costs

Accommodation and living costs are not included in our fees. 

For more information on accommodation and living costs, please see: Accommodation

Sources of financial support

If you receive funding from Student Finance you may be eligible to apply for additional benefits. Details can be obtained by visiting: www.gov.uk

Scholarships and additional funding

As an undergraduate student at Staffordshire, you may be eligible for additional financial support through one of our scholarships and bursaries. You can visit our funding page to find out more and check your eligibility.

Scholarships and additional funding

As an undergraduate student at Staffordshire, you may be eligible for additional financial support through one of our scholarships and bursaries. You can visit our funding page to find out more and check your eligibility.

Scholarships and additional funding

As an undergraduate student at Staffordshire, you may be eligible for additional financial support through one of our scholarships and bursaries. You can visit our funding page to find out more and check your eligibility.

Apply

Location Award Study option Start date Apply Link
Stoke-on-Trent campus BSc (Hons) Full-time 25 September 2023 Apply now

Rules and regulations

If you are offered a place at Staffordshire University, your offer will be subject to our rules, regulations and enrolment conditions, which may vary from time to time.

Students of Staffordshire University enter into a contract with us and are bound by these rules and regulations, which are subject to change. For more information, please see: University Policies and Regulations.

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Complete University Guide 2022

for Social Inclusion

The Times and The Sunday Times Good University Guide 2023

for Course Content

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of Research Impact is ‘Outstanding’ or ‘Very Considerable’

Research Excellence Framework 2021