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Criminology

Work placement

Take advantage of a guaranteed work placement in a relevant industry

Connected professionals

Study under academics with active professional connections in the field

Dedicated facilities

Get access to facilities such as our dedication mock courtroom and Crime Scene House

UCAS code:
M012
Location:
Stoke-on-Trent campus
Study option:
Full-time
Choose another study option
Duration:
3 Years
Start date:
14 September 2020
Book onto an Open Day Enquire about this course Apply now

Have you ever wondered what makes the lawless tick? Study our dynamic and diverse criminology course - where you’ll delve into the criminal mind, challenge your conceptions of society, and develop a thorough understanding of human rights.

At Staffordshire University, you’ll study the complex causes of crime and how our societies should respond to pressing problems, such as domestic violence, knife crime, or drug related crime, as well as supra national issues such as terrorism and transnational organised crime. What’s more, you’ll  learn to consider the  social context in which crime and punishment takes place,  and eventually, you’ll start to challenge your preconceptions of ‘violence’, ‘harm’ and ‘justice’.

You’ll explore the relationship between criminological theories and criminal justice policies and practices. You’ll be investigating and discussing the explanations for crime and how the courts deal with them. Plus, you’ll explore the role of punishment and the secure estate, investigate crimes of the powerful, and come to understand the role of the media within the justice system.

You won’t just be learning theory either, throughout the course you’ll develop priceless employability skills while studying core modules that align with the probation training required knowledge qualifying modules. There’s also the benefit of additional expertise in policing, forensics and law to complement the expertise in Criminology. This, combined with opportunities of work placement and the chance to establish future connections during the course, means you’ll leave with the best chance of launching a future career in criminology.

On successful completion of study, we will issue the following award: BSc (Hons) Criminology

On successful completion of study, we will issue the following award: BSc (Hons) Criminology

On successful completion of study, we will issue the following award: BSc (Hons) Criminology

On successful completion of study, we will issue the following award: MSci Criminology

On successful completion of study, we will issue the following award: MSci Criminology

Part-time study

Part-time study available over 6 years.

Part-time study

Part-time study available over 6 years.

Part-time study

Part-time study available over 6 years.

Part-time study

Part-time study over 8 years.

Part-time study

Part-time study available over 6 years.

Course content

During your time of study with us, you will come to understand the development of the criminal justice institutions (police, prisons and courts) in the UK, as well as the inter-relationships between these systems, as mechanisms to respond to crimes and social harms.

We will consider how different social groups and individuals experience crimes and social harms, as well as the policies and regulatory responses that are supposed to alleviate or ameliorate these issues. During the course, you will also come to understand the construction and representation of crime and of responses to it in policy making, the media in all its forms, and public opinion. We develop in you an understanding and appropriate use of research strategies and methods in criminological research.

You will be taught be research active, dedicated Criminology lecturers who will encourage you to become involved both with the course and also the research of the lecturers.

During your time of study with us, you will come to understand the development of the criminal justice institutions (police, prisons and courts) in the UK, as well as the inter-relationships between these systems, as mechanisms to respond to crimes and social harms.

We will consider how different social groups and individuals experience crimes and social harms, as well as the policies and regulatory responses that are supposed to alleviate or ameliorate these issues. During the course, you will also come to understand the construction and representation of crime and of responses to it in policy making, the media in all its forms, and public opinion. We develop in you an understanding and appropriate use of research strategies and methods in criminological research.

You will be taught be research active, dedicated Criminology lecturers who will encourage you to become involved both with the course and also the research of the lecturers.

During your time of study with us, you will come to understand the development of the criminal justice institutions (police, prisons and courts) in the UK, as well as the inter-relationships between these systems, as mechanisms to respond to crimes and social harms.

We will consider how different social groups and individuals experience crimes and social harms, as well as the policies and regulatory responses that are supposed to alleviate or ameliorate these issues. During the course, you will also come to understand the construction and representation of crime and of responses to it in policy making, the media in all its forms, and public opinion. We develop in you an understanding and appropriate use of research strategies and methods in criminological research.

You will be taught be research active, dedicated Criminology lecturers who will encourage you to become involved both with the course and also the research of the lecturers.

During your time of study with us, you will come to understand the development of the criminal justice institutions (police, prisons and courts) in the UK, as well as the inter-relationships between these systems, as mechanisms to respond to crimes and social harms.

We will consider how different social groups and individuals experience crimes and social harms, as well as the policies and regulatory responses that are supposed to alleviate or ameliorate these issues. During the course, you will also come to understand the construction and representation of crime and of responses to it in policy making, the media in all its forms, and public opinion. We develop in you an understanding and appropriate use of research strategies and methods in criminological research.

You will be taught be research active, dedicated Criminology lecturers who will encourage you to become involved both with the course and also the research of the lecturers.

During your time of study with us, you will come to understand the development of the criminal justice institutions (police, prisons and courts) in the UK, as well as the inter-relationships between these systems, as mechanisms to respond to crimes and social harms.

We will consider how different social groups and individuals experience crimes and social harms, as well as the policies and regulatory responses that are supposed to alleviate or ameliorate these issues. During the course, you will also come to understand the construction and representation of crime and of responses to it in policy making, the media in all its forms, and public opinion. We develop in you an understanding and appropriate use of research strategies and methods in criminological research.

You will be taught be research active, dedicated Criminology lecturers who will encourage you to become involved both with the course and also the research of the lecturers.

Modules

The tables provide an indicative list of the modules that make up the course for the current academic year. Each module is worth a specified number of credits. Our teaching is informed by research, and modules change periodically to reflect developments in the discipline. We aim to ensure that all modules run as scheduled. If for any reason a module cannot be run we will advise you as soon as possible and will provide guidance on selecting an appropriate alternative module.

Standard route

Year 1 compulsory modules
Crime And Punishment In The Modern Era 15 credits
Discovering Qualitative Research Methods 15 credits
Introduction To Criminology 15 credits
Introduction To Project Design And Research Practice 15 credits
Media, Representation And Society 15 credits
Psychological Contexts Of Crime And Punishment 30 credits
The Criminal Justice Process 15 credits
Year 2 compulsory modules
Designing And Conducting Quantitative Research 15 credits
Designing Your Dissertation Research Project 15 credits
New Directions In Criminology: Theory And Concepts 15 credits
Professional Practice Placement 30 credits
Theories Of Crime And Justice 15 credits
Show 10 optional modules
Year 3 compulsory modules
Dissertation 60 credits
Show 10 optional modules

Modules

The tables provide an indicative list of the modules that make up the course for the current academic year. Each module is worth a specified number of credits. Our teaching is informed by research, and modules change periodically to reflect developments in the discipline. We aim to ensure that all modules run as scheduled. If for any reason a module cannot be run we will advise you as soon as possible and will provide guidance on selecting an appropriate alternative module.

Modules

The tables provide an indicative list of the modules that make up the course for the current academic year. Each module is worth a specified number of credits. Our teaching is informed by research, and modules change periodically to reflect developments in the discipline. We aim to ensure that all modules run as scheduled. If for any reason a module cannot be run we will advise you as soon as possible and will provide guidance on selecting an appropriate alternative module.

Modules

The tables provide an indicative list of the modules that make up the course for the current academic year. Each module is worth a specified number of credits. Our teaching is informed by research, and modules change periodically to reflect developments in the discipline. We aim to ensure that all modules run as scheduled. If for any reason a module cannot be run we will advise you as soon as possible and will provide guidance on selecting an appropriate alternative module.

Modules

The tables provide an indicative list of the modules that make up the course for the current academic year. Each module is worth a specified number of credits. Our teaching is informed by research, and modules change periodically to reflect developments in the discipline. We aim to ensure that all modules run as scheduled. If for any reason a module cannot be run we will advise you as soon as possible and will provide guidance on selecting an appropriate alternative module.

Typical UCAS Offer: 112 points

  • A levels: BBC 
  • BTEC: DMM

Typical UCAS Offer: 112 points

  • A levels: BBC 
  • BTEC: DMM

Typical UCAS Offer: 112 points

  • A levels: BBC 
  • BTEC: DMM

Typical UCAS Offer: 120 points

  • A levels: ABC
  • BTEC: DDM

Typical UCAS Offer: 120 points

  • A levels: ABC 
  • BTEC: DDM

Facilities

Careers

A Criminology degree from Staffordshire University unlocks the pathways to a wide range of rewarding and exciting careers, our graduates go on to establish careers in a multitude of fields within roles in the following sectors:

  • Private security services; NCA; MI5 & MI6
  • 3rd sector: victim support; rape crisis; drug and alcohol support
  • Graduate schemes
  • Social/crime related research roles
  • Local/central government – e.g. community safety partnerships, policymaking departments
  • Civil Service
  • Education

Interested in further study? A BSc (Hons) Criminology qualification will put you in the perfect position for masters level study in relevant areas.

Teaching and assessment

Teaching

Our teaching and learning strategies require you to engage with the curriculum through a variety of means. Teaching and learning methods include lectures, tutorials, student led learning groups; workshops; small group work; research projects; interactive lectures; team teaching; role playing and utilising the opportunities offered by information technology. Our core skills and research modules focus on a wide range of problem-solving activities to support and develop student learning and these are strongly connected to the employability agenda by enhancing transferable skills which are valued in the workplace. Where potential projects can be identified, and resources allow for it, group research projects are undertaken within or for community or voluntary organisations. These research opportunities make the most of the valuable transferable skills in ‘real’ rather than purely ‘academic’ learning environments and provide you with real work experience. Seminars and workshops are designed to facilitate in-depth discussion, pursuit of enquiry and a collegiate environment.

Our teaching and learning strategies require you to engage with the curriculum through a variety of means. Teaching and learning methods include lectures, tutorials, student led learning groups; workshops; small group work; research projects; interactive lectures; team teaching; role playing and utilising the opportunities offered by information technology. Our core skills and research modules focus on a wide range of problem-solving activities to support and develop student learning and these are strongly connected to the employability agenda by enhancing transferable skills which are valued in the workplace. Where potential projects can be identified, and resources allow for it, group research projects are undertaken within or for community or voluntary organisations. These research opportunities make the most of the valuable transferable skills in ‘real’ rather than purely ‘academic’ learning environments and provide you with real work experience. Seminars and workshops are designed to facilitate in-depth discussion, pursuit of enquiry and a collegiate environment.

Our teaching and learning strategies require you to engage with the curriculum through a variety of means. Teaching and learning methods include lectures, tutorials, student led learning groups; workshops; small group work; research projects; interactive lectures; team teaching; role playing and utilising the opportunities offered by information technology. Our core skills and research modules focus on a wide range of problem-solving activities to support and develop student learning and these are strongly connected to the employability agenda by enhancing transferable skills which are valued in the workplace. Where potential projects can be identified, and resources allow for it, group research projects are undertaken within or for community or voluntary organisations. These research opportunities make the most of the valuable transferable skills in ‘real’ rather than purely ‘academic’ learning environments and provide you with real work experience. Seminars and workshops are designed to facilitate in-depth discussion, pursuit of enquiry and a collegiate environment.

Our teaching and learning strategies require you to engage with the curriculum through a variety of means. Teaching and learning methods include lectures, tutorials, student led learning groups; workshops; small group work; research projects; interactive lectures; team teaching; role playing and utilising the opportunities offered by information technology. Our core skills and research modules focus on a wide range of problem-solving activities to support and develop student learning and these are strongly connected to the employability agenda by enhancing transferable skills which are valued in the workplace. Where potential projects can be identified, and resources allow for it, group research projects are undertaken within or for community or voluntary organisations. These research opportunities make the most of the valuable transferable skills in ‘real’ rather than purely ‘academic’ learning environments and provide you with real work experience. Seminars and workshops are designed to facilitate in-depth discussion, pursuit of enquiry and a collegiate environment.

Our teaching and learning strategies require you to engage with the curriculum through a variety of means. Teaching and learning methods include lectures, tutorials, student led learning groups; workshops; small group work; research projects; interactive lectures; team teaching; role playing and utilising the opportunities offered by information technology. Our core skills and research modules focus on a wide range of problem-solving activities to support and develop student learning and these are strongly connected to the employability agenda by enhancing transferable skills which are valued in the workplace. Where potential projects can be identified, and resources allow for it, group research projects are undertaken within or for community or voluntary organisations. These research opportunities make the most of the valuable transferable skills in ‘real’ rather than purely ‘academic’ learning environments and provide you with real work experience. Seminars and workshops are designed to facilitate in-depth discussion, pursuit of enquiry and a collegiate environment.

Assessment

We recognise the importance of enabling you to benefit from a range of different forms of assessment. Therefore, you will encounter both traditional (for example, unseen examinations and essays) and newer modes of assessment (portfolios; reflective diaries; case studies; presentations). The assessment strategy also includes the reflective portfolio and presentation we use to assess the placement module (and the placement year for those taking the BSc (Hons) Criminology with a Placement Year). Our assessment strategy strives to provide a mixture of controlled forms of assessment (examinations) and autonomous forms which are reviewed annually via award monitoring. This variety of assessment arises from a concern firstly, to ensure that you can realise your educational potential as fully as possible and secondly, to ensure that you are exposed to forms of assessment which enable you to demonstrate a range of learning outcomes appropriate to the particular modules, levels and award.

We recognise the importance of enabling you to benefit from a range of different forms of assessment. Therefore, you will encounter both traditional (for example, unseen examinations and essays) and newer modes of assessment (portfolios; reflective diaries; case studies; presentations). The assessment strategy also includes the reflective portfolio and presentation we use to assess the placement module (and the placement year for those taking the BSc (Hons) Criminology with a Placement Year). Our assessment strategy strives to provide a mixture of controlled forms of assessment (examinations) and autonomous forms which are reviewed annually via award monitoring. This variety of assessment arises from a concern firstly, to ensure that you can realise your educational potential as fully as possible and secondly, to ensure that you are exposed to forms of assessment which enable you to demonstrate a range of learning outcomes appropriate to the particular modules, levels and award.

We recognise the importance of enabling you to benefit from a range of different forms of assessment. Therefore, you will encounter both traditional (for example, unseen examinations and essays) and newer modes of assessment (portfolios; reflective diaries; case studies; presentations). The assessment strategy also includes the reflective portfolio and presentation we use to assess the placement module (and the placement year for those taking the BSc (Hons) Criminology with a Placement Year). Our assessment strategy strives to provide a mixture of controlled forms of assessment (examinations) and autonomous forms which are reviewed annually via award monitoring. This variety of assessment arises from a concern firstly, to ensure that you can realise your educational potential as fully as possible and secondly, to ensure that you are exposed to forms of assessment which enable you to demonstrate a range of learning outcomes appropriate to the particular modules, levels and award.

We recognise the importance of enabling you to benefit from a range of different forms of assessment. Therefore, you will encounter both traditional (for example, unseen examinations and essays) and newer modes of assessment (portfolios; reflective diaries; case studies; presentations). The assessment strategy also includes the reflective portfolio and presentation we use to assess the placement module (and the placement year for those taking the BSc (Hons) Criminology with a Placement Year). Our assessment strategy strives to provide a mixture of controlled forms of assessment (examinations) and autonomous forms which are reviewed annually via award monitoring. This variety of assessment arises from a concern firstly, to ensure that you can realise your educational potential as fully as possible and secondly, to ensure that you are exposed to forms of assessment which enable you to demonstrate a range of learning outcomes appropriate to the particular modules, levels and award.

We recognise the importance of enabling you to benefit from a range of different forms of assessment. Therefore, you will encounter both traditional (for example, unseen examinations and essays) and newer modes of assessment (portfolios; reflective diaries; case studies; presentations). The assessment strategy also includes the reflective portfolio and presentation we use to assess the placement module (and the placement year for those taking the BSc (Hons) Criminology with a Placement Year). Our assessment strategy strives to provide a mixture of controlled forms of assessment (examinations) and autonomous forms which are reviewed annually via award monitoring. This variety of assessment arises from a concern firstly, to ensure that you can realise your educational potential as fully as possible and secondly, to ensure that you are exposed to forms of assessment which enable you to demonstrate a range of learning outcomes appropriate to the particular modules, levels and award.

Learning support

In addition to the excellent support you will receive from your course teaching team, our central Academic Skills team provides group and one-to-one help to support your learning in a number of areas. These include study skills (including reading, note-taking and presentation skills); written English (including punctuation and grammatical accuracy); academic writing (including how to reference); research skills; critical thinking and understanding arguments; and revision, assessment and examination skills (including time management).

Additional support

Our AccessAbility Services support students with additional needs such as sensory impairment, or learning difficulties such as dyslexia.

Feedback

Feedback on your performance is provided in a variety of ways – all the way through the course you will be receiving informal and more detailed feedback on your performance, in your discussions with teaching staff in seminars or tutorials for instance. Feedback should help you to self-assess your work as you progress through the module and help you to better understand your subject.

Feedback is not just the marks at the end of a module – it could regular verbal advice about your work, perhaps as you develop a portfolio of work, comments made by tutors or fellow students in group discussions or the written comments on your work.

Feedback on your performance is provided in a variety of ways – all the way through the course you will be receiving informal and more detailed feedback on your performance, in your discussions with teaching staff in seminars or tutorials for instance. Feedback should help you to self-assess your work as you progress through the module and help you to better understand your subject.

Feedback is not just the marks at the end of a module – it could regular verbal advice about your work, perhaps as you develop a portfolio of work, comments made by tutors or fellow students in group discussions or the written comments on your work.

Feedback on your performance is provided in a variety of ways – all the way through the course you will be receiving informal and more detailed feedback on your performance, in your discussions with teaching staff in seminars or tutorials for instance. Feedback should help you to self-assess your work as you progress through the module and help you to better understand your subject.

Feedback is not just the marks at the end of a module – it could regular verbal advice about your work, perhaps as you develop a portfolio of work, comments made by tutors or fellow students in group discussions or the written comments on your work.

Feedback on your performance is provided in a variety of ways – all the way through the course you will be receiving informal and more detailed feedback on your performance, in your discussions with teaching staff in seminars or tutorials for instance. Feedback should help you to self-assess your work as you progress through the module and help you to better understand your subject.

Feedback is not just the marks at the end of a module – it could regular verbal advice about your work, perhaps as you develop a portfolio of work, comments made by tutors or fellow students in group discussions or the written comments on your work.

Feedback on your performance is provided in a variety of ways – all the way through the course you will be receiving informal and more detailed feedback on your performance, in your discussions with teaching staff in seminars or tutorials for instance. Feedback should help you to self-assess your work as you progress through the module and help you to better understand your subject.

Feedback is not just the marks at the end of a module – it could regular verbal advice about your work, perhaps as you develop a portfolio of work, comments made by tutors or fellow students in group discussions or the written comments on your work.

Staff

You will be taught be dedicated, research active, enthusiastic lecturers who will put your student experience and learning at the forefront of their work. Each of our team has a PhD, or is working towards one, and all are members of the Higher Education Authority. Each of our team has extensive contacts within the Criminal Justice System and/or local community partnerships.

Dr Jo Turner
Dr Jo Turner Course Leader – Criminology

I joined Staffordshire University in 2017 as senior lecturer and undergraduate course leader for Criminology and Sociology having been senior lecturer and programme leader for Criminology at the University of Chester between 2012 and 2017.

I teach Advanced Criminal Theory in the Criminology Masters. I also teach on the Transnational Organised Crime Masters and supervise the dissertation for this course and the Terrorism Masters. 

Read full profile

For the course starting on 14 September 2020 the tuition fees are:

Study option
Full-time
UK / EU / Channel Islands
£9,250 per year of study
International (Non-EU)
£14,000 per year of study

For the course starting on 14 September 2020 the tuition fees are:

Study option
Part-time
UK / EU / Channel Islands
£4,620 per year of study

For the course starting on 14 September 2020 the tuition fees are:

Study option
Full-time
UK / EU / Channel Islands
To be confirmed

For the course starting on 14 September 2020 the tuition fees are:

Study option
Full-time
UK / EU / Channel Islands
£9,250 per year of study
International (Non-EU)
£14,000 per year of study

UK, EU and Channel Island students: This tuition fee is agreed subject to UK government policy and parliamentary regulation. If the UK government passes appropriate legislation, the fee for subsequent years of study may increase in each academic year. But this increase will not exceed the rate of inflation as measured by RPIX**. Any change in fees will apply to both new and continuing students. The University will notify students of any change as early as possible. Further information about fee changes would be posted on the University’s website once this becomes available.

**RPIX is a measure of inflation equivalent to all the items in the Retail Price Index (RPI) excluding mortgage interest payments.

International (Non-EU) students: Tuition fees will remain the same for each year of your course, as long as you complete it in the normal time-frame (i.e. no repeat years or breaks in study).

Our students

about
Lisa Wood
Criminology

As a mature student working and studying part time, Staffs Uni have been incredibly supportive. Last year was amazing; I completed modules on Reasearching Social Life and Terrorism. For the RSL module, I linked study with my current role working within the education sector and was able to produce a piece of qualitative research related to my job. The course was broken down methodically and this appealed to me as I try to maintain a work/study/home life balance.

Apply

Stoke-on-Trent campus
BSc (Hons)
Full-time
14 September 2020

Rules and regulations

If you are offered a place at Staffordshire University, your offer will be subject to our rules, regulations and enrolment conditions, which may vary from time to time.

Students of Staffordshire University enter into a contract with us and are bound by these rules and regulations, which are subject to change. For more information, please see: University Policies and Regulations.

Social media

23/10/2019 18:05:13 / Criminology / Full-time / 15.0 / 36.0 / SSTK-11855 / Direct link

23/10/2019 18:05:13 / Criminology / Part-time / 6.0 / 36.0 / SSTK-11856 / Direct link

23/10/2019 18:05:13 / Criminology / Full-time, with a placement year / 7.0 / 36.0 / SSTK-11857 / Direct link

23/10/2019 18:05:13 / Criminology / Part-time / 6.0 / 36.0 / SSTK-11859 / Direct link

23/10/2019 18:05:13 / Criminology / Full-time / 7.0 / 36.0 / SSTK-11858 / Direct link