Psychology

Study options

Award

BSc (Hons)

Key facts

UCAS code:
C800
UCAS code:
C803
UCAS code:
C801
Location:
Stoke-on-Trent campus
Location:
Stoke-on-Trent campus
Location:
City of Stoke-On-Trent Sixth Form College
Location:
Stoke-on-Trent campus
Study option:
Full-time, Stoke-on-Trent campus
Study option:
Full-time, Stoke-on-Trent campus, with a placement year
Study option:
Full-time, with a foundation year at City of Stoke-On-Trent Sixth Form College
Study option:
Part-time, Stoke-on-Trent campus
Duration:
3 Years
Duration:
4 Years
Duration:
4 Years
Duration:
6 Years
Start date:
19 September 2022

Real-world experience

You'll get the opportunity to take an optional work placement in year two

Industry accreditation

Accredited by the BPS

Study in our £30m Science Centre

Learn key concepts in our specialist Observation and Cognitive Suites

Our Psychology degree will help you to apply scientific knowledge of the mind to recognise people's behaviour and to understand why they act in the way they do.

Human behaviour influences every facet of our everyday life, from the decisions we make, to how we respond to our environment and those around us.

Our Psychology degree will help you to apply scientific knowledge of the mind to recognise people's behaviour and to understand why they act in the way they do.

You'll develop useful and transferable skills in problem solving, communication, critical thinking and evaluation.

By the end of the course, you will be equipped with all of the necessary skills and knowledge to design and create your very own investigations and experiments.

If studying the Foundation Year, you will transfer onto Year 1 of the Psychology BSc (Hons) course on successful completion, or you can transfer onto Year 1 of any of the other undergraduate Psychology courses. (From 2022 some module titles will change, and BSc (Hons) Forensic Psychology and BSc (Hons) Psychology and Criminology will be merged to form a new course “Forensic and Criminological Psychology”, subject to validation/accreditation).

Human behaviour influences every facet of our everyday life, from the decisions we make, to how we respond to our environment and those around us.

Our Psychology degree will help you to apply scientific knowledge of the mind to recognise people's behaviour and to understand why they act in the way they do.

You'll develop useful and transferable skills in problem solving, communication, critical thinking and evaluation.

By the end of the course, you will be equipped with all of the necessary skills and knowledge to design and create your very own investigations and experiments.

If studying the Foundation Year, you will transfer onto Year 1 of the Psychology BSc (Hons) course on successful completion, or you can transfer onto Year 1 of any of the other undergraduate Psychology courses. (From 2022 some module titles will change, and BSc (Hons) Forensic Psychology and BSc (Hons) Psychology and Criminology will be merged to form a new course “Forensic and Criminological Psychology”, subject to validation/accreditation).

Human behaviour influences every facet of our everyday life, from the decisions we make, to how we respond to our environment and those around us.

Our Psychology degree will help you to apply scientific knowledge of the mind to recognise people's behaviour and to understand why they act in the way they do.

You'll develop useful and transferable skills in problem solving, communication, critical thinking and evaluation.

By the end of the course, you will be equipped with all of the necessary skills and knowledge to design and create your very own investigations and experiments.

If studying the Foundation Year, you will transfer onto Year 1 of the Psychology BSc (Hons) course on successful completion, or you can transfer onto Year 1 of any of the other undergraduate Psychology courses. (From 2022 some module titles will change, and BSc (Hons) Forensic Psychology and BSc (Hons) Psychology and Criminology will be merged to form a new course “Forensic and Criminological Psychology”, subject to validation/accreditation).

Human behaviour influences every facet of our everyday life, from the decisions we make, to how we respond to our environment and those around us.

Our Psychology degree will help you to apply scientific knowledge of the mind to recognise people's behaviour and to understand why they act in the way they do.

You'll develop useful and transferable skills in problem solving, communication, critical thinking and evaluation.

By the end of the course, you will be equipped with all of the necessary skills and knowledge to design and create your very own investigations and experiments.

If studying the Foundation Year, you will transfer onto Year 1 of the Psychology BSc (Hons) course on successful completion, or you can transfer onto Year 1 of any of the other undergraduate Psychology courses. (From 2022 some module titles will change, and BSc (Hons) Forensic Psychology and BSc (Hons) Psychology and Criminology will be merged to form a new course “Forensic and Criminological Psychology”, subject to validation/accreditation).

On successful completion of study, we will issue the following award: BSc (Hons) Psychology

On successful completion of study, we will issue the following award: BSc (Hons) Psychology

On successful completion of study, we will issue the following award: BSc (Hons) Psychology

On successful completion of study, we will issue the following award: BSc (Hons) Psychology

Work placements

Students on all undergraduate Psychology courses at Staffordshire University can opt to undertake a placement (sandwich) year; a structured work experience opportunity which enables you to develop and implement psychology specific and transferable skills whilst getting experience in a professional working environment. 

Placements take place between levels 5 and 6 of our undergraduate degrees and last for a period of 9 months, from September to June. The Placement Year is an assessed, pass/fail year that would be added to your existing programme of study. The assessment is by written reflection and submission of a placement activity log. Please note that it is the responsibility of the student to secure their own work placement – we will of course support you through the selection, application and approval process.

Throughout your placement period you will be supervised by a Workplace Supervisor, (usually your line manager) and you and your supervisor will have regular contact with the University through an allocated University Placement Supervisor. Contact with both you and your workplace supervisor may at times be via phone or Skype, and you will also receive at least one planned visit by your University Placement Supervisor to the workplace towards the beginning of the Placement.

Our current placement year students are working in various charity organisations, and as research assistants within higher education institutions.

The fee for the placement year will vary depending on the year – please get in contact if you would like more information about this.

The Psychology Department works with local, regional and national employers alongside international university partners to provide students with placement and work experience opportunities both in the UK and abroad. 

Course content

During your first two years of degree study, we put the emphasis on skill development to ensure you grow into an independent and inquisitive learner.

In Year 3, you’ll take greater control of your own studies and will be able to choose from a wide range of specialist options to conduct your own piece of empirical research. Your research project lets you put into practice the skills you’ve developed throughout the course.

You will also be encouraged, where possible, to contribute new findings and theory to existing knowledge in your specialist area. A variety of teaching and learning methods are employed to deliver the course and these are tailored to complement your needs. These include: formal essays, class tests, coursework, presentations and examinations.

A crucial part of becoming a psychologist is learning to understand, conduct, and analyse scientific research. As with all high-quality undergraduate psychology degrees, this means our courses feature modules that focus on teaching these skills. We take great care in closely guiding students through this learning process (via small group teaching, group work with peers, support clinics and step-by-step guides) supporting our students in preparation for the increasingly data-driven world.

A foundation year is available for applicants who do not have the appropriate entry qualifications for direct entry to the degree level course. The foundation year for this course has a long track record of success in providing a smooth transition to our BSc (Hons) Psychology degree or any one of our other psychology based courses. (From 2022 some module titles will change, and BSc (Hons) Forensic Psychology and BSc (Hons) Psychology and Criminology will be merged to form a new course “Forensic and Criminological Psychology", subject to validation/accreditation).

During your first two years of degree study, we put the emphasis on skill development to ensure you grow into an independent and inquisitive learner.

In Year 3, you’ll take greater control of your own studies and will be able to choose from a wide range of specialist options to conduct your own piece of empirical research. Your research project lets you put into practice the skills you’ve developed throughout the course.

You will also be encouraged, where possible, to contribute new findings and theory to existing knowledge in your specialist area. A variety of teaching and learning methods are employed to deliver the course and these are tailored to complement your needs. These include: formal essays, class tests, coursework, presentations and examinations.

A crucial part of becoming a psychologist is learning to understand, conduct, and analyse scientific research. As with all high-quality undergraduate psychology degrees, this means our courses feature modules that focus on teaching these skills. We take great care in closely guiding students through this learning process (via small group teaching, group work with peers, support clinics and step-by-step guides) supporting our students in preparation for the increasingly data-driven world.

A foundation year is available for applicants who do not have the appropriate entry qualifications for direct entry to the degree level course. The foundation year for this course has a long track record of success in providing a smooth transition to our BSc (Hons) Psychology degree or any one of our other psychology based courses. (From 2022 some module titles will change, and BSc (Hons) Forensic Psychology and BSc (Hons) Psychology and Criminology will be merged to form a new course “Forensic and Criminological Psychology", subject to validation/accreditation).

During your first two years of degree study, we put the emphasis on skill development to ensure you grow into an independent and inquisitive learner.

In Year 3, you’ll take greater control of your own studies and will be able to choose from a wide range of specialist options to conduct your own piece of empirical research. Your research project lets you put into practice the skills you’ve developed throughout the course.

You will also be encouraged, where possible, to contribute new findings and theory to existing knowledge in your specialist area. A variety of teaching and learning methods are employed to deliver the course and these are tailored to complement your needs. These include: formal essays, class tests, coursework, presentations and examinations.

A crucial part of becoming a psychologist is learning to understand, conduct, and analyse scientific research. As with all high-quality undergraduate psychology degrees, this means our courses feature modules that focus on teaching these skills. We take great care in closely guiding students through this learning process (via small group teaching, group work with peers, support clinics and step-by-step guides) supporting our students in preparation for the increasingly data-driven world.

A foundation year is available for applicants who do not have the appropriate entry qualifications for direct entry to the degree level course. The foundation year for this course has a long track record of success in providing a smooth transition to our BSc (Hons) Psychology degree or any one of our other psychology based courses. (From 2022 some module titles will change, and BSc (Hons) Forensic Psychology and BSc (Hons) Psychology and Criminology will be merged to form a new course “Forensic and Criminological Psychology", subject to validation/accreditation).

During your first two years of degree study, we put the emphasis on skill development to ensure you grow into an independent and inquisitive learner.

In Year 3, you’ll take greater control of your own studies and will be able to choose from a wide range of specialist options to conduct your own piece of empirical research. Your research project lets you put into practice the skills you’ve developed throughout the course.

You will also be encouraged, where possible, to contribute new findings and theory to existing knowledge in your specialist area. A variety of teaching and learning methods are employed to deliver the course and these are tailored to complement your needs. These include: formal essays, class tests, coursework, presentations and examinations.

A crucial part of becoming a psychologist is learning to understand, conduct, and analyse scientific research. As with all high-quality undergraduate psychology degrees, this means our courses feature modules that focus on teaching these skills. We take great care in closely guiding students through this learning process (via small group teaching, group work with peers, support clinics and step-by-step guides) supporting our students in preparation for the increasingly data-driven world.

A foundation year is available for applicants who do not have the appropriate entry qualifications for direct entry to the degree level course. The foundation year for this course has a long track record of success in providing a smooth transition to our BSc (Hons) Psychology degree or any one of our other psychology based courses. (From 2022 some module titles will change, and BSc (Hons) Forensic Psychology and BSc (Hons) Psychology and Criminology will be merged to form a new course “Forensic and Criminological Psychology", subject to validation/accreditation).

Academic year

The course operates on a modular basis that provides flexibility and choice. Typically the majority of modules are 30 academic credits with a smaller number of 15 credit modules. Each credit taken equates to a total study time of around 10 hours. Total study time includes scheduled teaching, independent study and assessment activity. Full-time students take modules worth 60 credits per semester, with part-time students taking proportionately fewer credits per semester. All students take a total of 120 credits per level and 360 credits for the degree as a whole. Your overall grade for the course and your degree classification are based on the marks obtained for modules taken at levels 5 and 6.  The full-time course has one start point in September.

The course operates on a modular basis that provides flexibility and choice. Typically the majority of modules are 30 academic credits with a smaller number of 15 credit modules. Each credit taken equates to a total study time of around 10 hours. Total study time includes scheduled teaching, independent study and assessment activity. Full-time students take modules worth 60 credits per semester, with part-time students taking proportionately fewer credits per semester. All students take a total of 120 credits per level and 360 credits for the degree as a whole. Your overall grade for the course and your degree classification are based on the marks obtained for modules taken at levels 5 and 6.  The full-time course has one start point in September.

The course operates on a modular basis that provides flexibility and choice. Typically the majority of modules are 30 academic credits with a smaller number of 15 credit modules. Each credit taken equates to a total study time of around 10 hours. Total study time includes scheduled teaching, independent study and assessment activity. Full-time students take modules worth 60 credits per semester, with part-time students taking proportionately fewer credits per semester. All students take a total of 120 credits per level and 360 credits for the degree as a whole. Your overall grade for the course and your degree classification are based on the marks obtained for modules taken at levels 5 and 6.  The full-time course has one start point in September.

The course operates on a modular basis that provides flexibility and choice. Typically the majority of modules are 30 academic credits with a smaller number of 15 credit modules. Each credit taken equates to a total study time of around 10 hours. Total study time includes scheduled teaching, independent study and assessment activity. Full-time students take modules worth 60 credits per semester, with part-time students taking proportionately fewer credits per semester. All students take a total of 120 credits per level and 360 credits for the degree as a whole. Your overall grade for the course and your degree classification are based on the marks obtained for modules taken at levels 5 and 6.  The full-time course has one start point in September.

Professional body accreditation

Accredited against the requirements for the Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership (GBC) of the British Psychological Society (BPS).

The British Psychological Society

Professional body accreditation

Accredited against the requirements for the Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership (GBC) of the British Psychological Society (BPS).

The British Psychological Society

Professional body accreditation

Accredited against the requirements for the Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership (GBC) of the British Psychological Society (BPS).

The British Psychological Society

Professional body accreditation

Accredited against the requirements for the Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership (GBC) of the British Psychological Society (BPS).

The British Psychological Society
BSc (Hons) Psychology - Joh Turner

BSc (Hons) Psychology - Joh Turner

Video

Student Joh discusses her time on our BSc (Hons) Psychology degree.

Modules

The tables provide an indicative list of the modules that make up the course for the current academic year. Each module is worth a specified number of credits. Our teaching is informed by research, and modules change periodically to reflect developments in the discipline. We aim to ensure that all modules run as scheduled. If for any reason a module cannot be run we will advise you as soon as possible and will provide guidance on selecting an appropriate alternative module.

Modules

The tables provide an indicative list of the modules that make up the course for the current academic year. Each module is worth a specified number of credits. Our teaching is informed by research, and modules change periodically to reflect developments in the discipline. We aim to ensure that all modules run as scheduled. If for any reason a module cannot be run we will advise you as soon as possible and will provide guidance on selecting an appropriate alternative module.

Modules

The tables provide an indicative list of the modules that make up the course for the current academic year. Each module is worth a specified number of credits. Our teaching is informed by research, and modules change periodically to reflect developments in the discipline. We aim to ensure that all modules run as scheduled. If for any reason a module cannot be run we will advise you as soon as possible and will provide guidance on selecting an appropriate alternative module.

Year 1 compulsory modules
Year 1 compulsory modules
Experimental Design And Research Methods (Practical Investigations) 30 credits
Foundations Of Psychology 30 credits
Information Technology And Study Skills 30 credits
Social And Applied Psychology 30 credits

Modules

The tables provide an indicative list of the modules that make up the course for the current academic year. Each module is worth a specified number of credits. Our teaching is informed by research, and modules change periodically to reflect developments in the discipline. We aim to ensure that all modules run as scheduled. If for any reason a module cannot be run we will advise you as soon as possible and will provide guidance on selecting an appropriate alternative module.

Year 1 compulsory modules
Year 1 compulsory modules
Foundations Of Psychology 30 credits
Perspectives In Psychology 30 credits
Year 3 compulsory modules
Year 3 compulsory modules
Cognitive And Biological Determinants Of Behaviour 30 credits
Understanding The Social World 30 credits
Year 6 compulsory modules
Year 6 compulsory modules
Psychology Project 30 credits
Show 9 optional modules

Entry requirements

Typical UCAS Offer: 112 points

  • A levels: BBC
  • 2 A level: 96 points
  • BTEC: DMM

Typical UCAS Offer: 112 points

  • A levels: BBC
  • 2 A level: 96 points
  • BTEC: DMM
  • Typical UCAS Offer: 48 points to include one A2 pass or equivalent
  • A levels: A, DD, EEE
  • BTEC: PPP
  • For mature applicants with no formal qualifications, an interview will be required

Typical UCAS Offer: 112 points

  • A levels: BBC
  • 2 A level: 96 points
  • BTEC: DMM

We understand that you might have experienced a challenging run up to higher education and may have not met the entry requirements as listed. If this is the case don’t worry, contact us and our team of expert advisors can guide you through the next stages of application, or help you find the perfect course for your needs.

BSc (Hons) Psychology - Jaime-Lee Cunningham

BSc (Hons) Psychology - Jaime-Lee Cunningham

Video

Former student Jaime-Lee talks about her time on the BSc (Hons) Psychology degree.

For equivalent entry requirements in your home country, please see the information on our country pages.

Choose your country

Check our entry and English language requirements for your country.

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Careers

You will be provided with opportunities to prepare you for employment.

With our psychology degree, you can follow a wide range of careers. Accreditation from the BPS means that after graduation, you can apply for postgraduate training in professional psychology, including clinical, educational, forensic, sport and exercise, occupational, health, and counselling.   A number of psychology graduates pursue careers as professional psychologists in the areas of organisation, health, counselling, education, forensic and clinical practice, while others find employment in industrial, commercial and public sector organisations.

Many graduates from this course use their specialist knowledge and transferable skills as the basis for careers in teaching, welfare, health, education, caring and guidance professions. To prospective employers, psychology offers a combination of analytic and personal skills. Graduates are able to analyse problems, use computer skills and design investigations and are especially aware of human relationships.

You can find out further information about our graduates on our InPsych Blog and Graduate Stories page. 

Psychology at Staffordshire University

Psychology at Staffordshire University

Video

Study Psychology and you’ll gain skills that will be valued by a range of employers.

Teaching and assessment

Teaching

Students learn in different ways. To help everyone get the most out of their studies, we teach students through a blend of lectures, seminars, workshops and laboratory practicals. Seminars enable you to discuss and develop your understanding of topics covered in lectures in smaller groups of around 16-18 students. In addition, you will have timetabled meetings with your personal tutor. You will be taught in first-class learning spaces throughout your course.

Students learn in different ways. To help everyone get the most out of their studies, we teach students through a blend of lectures, seminars, workshops and laboratory practicals. Seminars enable you to discuss and develop your understanding of topics covered in lectures in smaller groups of around 16-18 students. In addition, you will have timetabled meetings with your personal tutor. You will be taught in first-class learning spaces throughout your course.

Students learn in different ways. To help everyone get the most out of their studies, we teach students through a blend of lectures, seminars, workshops and laboratory practicals. Seminars enable you to discuss and develop your understanding of topics covered in lectures in smaller groups of around 16-18 students. In addition, you will have timetabled meetings with your personal tutor. You will be taught in first-class learning spaces throughout your course.

Students learn in different ways. To help everyone get the most out of their studies, we teach students through a blend of lectures, seminars, workshops and laboratory practicals. Seminars enable you to discuss and develop your understanding of topics covered in lectures in smaller groups of around 16-18 students. In addition, you will have timetabled meetings with your personal tutor. You will be taught in first-class learning spaces throughout your course.

Assessment

Your course will provide you with opportunities to test your understanding of your subject informally before you complete the formal assessments that count towards your final mark. Each module normally includes practice or ‘formative’ assessments, for which you receive feedback from your tutor. Practice assessments are developmental and any grades you receive for them do not count towards your module mark. There is a formal or ‘summative’ assessment at the end of each module. This includes a range of coursework assessments, such as essays, reports, portfolios, performance, presentations, final year, independent project and written examinations. The grades from formal assessments count towards your module mark.

Your course will provide you with opportunities to test your understanding of your subject informally before you complete the formal assessments that count towards your final mark. Each module normally includes practice or ‘formative’ assessments, for which you receive feedback from your tutor. Practice assessments are developmental and any grades you receive for them do not count towards your module mark. There is a formal or ‘summative’ assessment at the end of each module. This includes a range of coursework assessments, such as essays, reports, portfolios, performance, presentations, final year, independent project and written examinations. The grades from formal assessments count towards your module mark.

Your course will provide you with opportunities to test your understanding of your subject informally before you complete the formal assessments that count towards your final mark. Each module normally includes practice or ‘formative’ assessments, for which you receive feedback from your tutor. Practice assessments are developmental and any grades you receive for them do not count towards your module mark. There is a formal or ‘summative’ assessment at the end of each module. This includes a range of coursework assessments, such as essays, reports, portfolios, performance, presentations, final year, independent project and written examinations. The grades from formal assessments count towards your module mark.

Your course will provide you with opportunities to test your understanding of your subject informally before you complete the formal assessments that count towards your final mark. Each module normally includes practice or ‘formative’ assessments, for which you receive feedback from your tutor. Practice assessments are developmental and any grades you receive for them do not count towards your module mark. There is a formal or ‘summative’ assessment at the end of each module. This includes a range of coursework assessments, such as essays, reports, portfolios, performance, presentations, final year, independent project and written examinations. The grades from formal assessments count towards your module mark.

Learning support

In addition to the excellent support you will receive from your course teaching team, our central Academic Skills team provides group and one-to-one help to support your learning in a number of areas. These include study skills (including reading, note-taking and presentation skills); written English (including punctuation and grammatical accuracy); academic writing (including how to reference); research skills; critical thinking and understanding arguments; and revision, assessment and examination skills (including time management).

Additional support

Our Student Inclusion Services support students with additional needs such as sensory impairment, or learning difficulties such as dyslexia.

Feedback

You will normally receive feedback on coursework assessments within 20 working days following the date of submission. Examination feedback may take a variety of formats. However, as a minimum, generic feedback will be made available to all students who take written examinations.

You will normally receive feedback on coursework assessments within 20 working days following the date of submission. Examination feedback may take a variety of formats. However, as a minimum, generic feedback will be made available to all students who take written examinations.

You will normally receive feedback on coursework assessments within 20 working days following the date of submission. Examination feedback may take a variety of formats. However, as a minimum, generic feedback will be made available to all students who take written examinations.

You will normally receive feedback on coursework assessments within 20 working days following the date of submission. Examination feedback may take a variety of formats. However, as a minimum, generic feedback will be made available to all students who take written examinations.

The Staffordshire Centre for Psychological Research

Blog

For more information on our staff, their research interests and publications please visit our blog

Your study time will consist of class contact hours, self-directed learning, assessment and placements where appropriate. Your actual contact hours will depend on the subject area, on the option modules you select and professional body requirements. A typical composition of study time for this course is: 

Your study time will consist of class contact hours, self-directed learning, assessment and placements where appropriate. Your actual contact hours will depend on the subject area, on the option modules you select and professional body requirements. A typical composition of study time for this course is: 

Your study time will consist of class contact hours, self-directed learning, assessment and placements where appropriate. Your actual contact hours will depend on the subject area, on the option modules you select and professional body requirements. A typical composition of study time for this course is: 

Your study time will consist of class contact hours, self-directed learning, assessment and placements where appropriate. Your actual contact hours will depend on the subject area, on the option modules you select and professional body requirements. A typical composition of study time for this course is: 

Year 1

19% of time in lectures, seminars or similar
81% of time in independent study
0% of time in placements

Year 2

21% of time in lectures, seminars or similar
80% of time in independent study
0% of time in placements

Year 3

13% of time in lectures, seminars or similar
87% of time in independent study
0% of time in placements

Independent learning

When not attending lectures, seminars, laboratory or other timetabled sessions, you will be expected to continue learning independently through self-study. Typically, this will involve utilising a range of digital resources including our virtual learning environment; reading journals, articles and books; working on individual and group projects; undertaking research in the library; preparing coursework assignments and presentations, and preparing for examinations. Your independent learning will be supported by a range of excellent facilities. These include the library, open access computer facilities, informal learning zones and a range of laboratories. 

When not attending lectures, seminars, laboratory or other timetabled sessions, you will be expected to continue learning independently through self-study. Typically, this will involve utilising a range of digital resources including our virtual learning environment; reading journals, articles and books; working on individual and group projects; undertaking research in the library; preparing coursework assignments and presentations, and preparing for examinations. Your independent learning will be supported by a range of excellent facilities. These include the library, open access computer facilities, informal learning zones and a range of laboratories. 

When not attending lectures, seminars, laboratory or other timetabled sessions, you will be expected to continue learning independently through self-study. Typically, this will involve utilising a range of digital resources including our virtual learning environment; reading journals, articles and books; working on individual and group projects; undertaking research in the library; preparing coursework assignments and presentations, and preparing for examinations. Your independent learning will be supported by a range of excellent facilities. These include the library, open access computer facilities, informal learning zones and a range of laboratories. 

When not attending lectures, seminars, laboratory or other timetabled sessions, you will be expected to continue learning independently through self-study. Typically, this will involve utilising a range of digital resources including our virtual learning environment; reading journals, articles and books; working on individual and group projects; undertaking research in the library; preparing coursework assignments and presentations, and preparing for examinations. Your independent learning will be supported by a range of excellent facilities. These include the library, open access computer facilities, informal learning zones and a range of laboratories. 

Year 1

0% practical exams
55% coursework
45% written exams

Year 2

0% practical exams
60% coursework
40% written exams

Year 3

6% practical exams
82% coursework
13% written exams

Staff

You will be taught by an expert teaching team whose expertise and knowledge are closely matched to the content of the modules on the course. The team includes senior academics and professional practitioners with industry experience. Postgraduate research students who have undertaken teaching training may also contribute to the teaching of seminars under the supervision of the module leader.

Nichola Street

Senior Lecturer

Nikki's research interests are mainly within the realm of environmental psychology, individual differences and impact of visual beauty, such as art or the physical spaces in which we spend time. She is particularly interested in interdisciplinar…

Nichola's profile

Fees

For the course starting on 19 September 2022 the tuition fees are:

Tuition fees for BSc (Hons)-Full-time, Stoke-on-Trent campus
Study option UK / Channel Islands
Full-time To be confirmed

For the course starting on 12 September 2022 the tuition fees are:

Tuition fees for BSc (Hons) Full-time, Stoke-on-Trent campus, with a placement year
Study option UK / Channel Islands
Full-time To be confirmed

For the course starting on 12 September 2022 the tuition fees are:

Tuition fees for BSc (Hons) Full-time, with a foundation year at City of Stoke-On-Trent Sixth Form College
Study option UK / Channel Islands
Full-time To be confirmed

UK and Channel Island students: This tuition fee is agreed subject to UK government policy and parliamentary regulation. If the UK government passes appropriate legislation, the fee for subsequent years of study may increase in each academic year. But this increase will not exceed the rate of inflation as measured by RPIX**. Any change in fees will apply to both new and continuing students. The University will notify students of any change as early as possible. Further information about fee changes would be posted on the University’s website once this becomes available.

**RPIX is a measure of inflation equivalent to all the items in the Retail Price Index (RPI) excluding mortgage interest payments.

Included in tuition fees
Included in the fees:
  • DBS checks where required for compulsory modules 
  • Loan of subject related equipment where required
  • Compulsory field trips.
  • DBS checks where required for compulsory modules 
  • Loan of subject related equipment where required
  • Compulsory field trips.
  • DBS checks where required for compulsory modules 
  • Loan of subject related equipment where required
  • Compulsory field trips.
  • DBS checks where required for compulsory modules 
  • Loan of subject related equipment where required
  • Compulsory field trips.
Not included in tuition fees
Not included in the fees:
  • The estimated cost of text books over three years. Text books are available from the library, but some students chose to purchase their own copies
  • Printing
  • Travel costs to and from placements. We will have available placements within travel distance from the campus, or within proximity of your address
  • Clothing suitable for placements and facilities
  • Optional field trips
  • DBS checks where not required for compulsory modules
  • The estimated cost of text books over three years. Text books are available from the library, but some students chose to purchase their own copies
  • Printing
  • Travel costs to and from placements. We will have available placements within travel distance from the campus, or within proximity of your address
  • Clothing suitable for placements and facilities
  • Optional field trips
  • DBS checks where not required for compulsory modules
  • The estimated cost of text books over three years. Text books are available from the library, but some students chose to purchase their own copies
  • Printing
  • Travel costs to and from placements. We will have available placements within travel distance from the campus, or within proximity of your address
  • Clothing suitable for placements and facilities
  • Optional field trips
  • DBS checks where not required for compulsory modules
  • The estimated cost of text books over three years. Text books are available from the library, but some students chose to purchase their own copies
  • Printing
  • Travel costs to and from placements. We will have available placements within travel distance from the campus, or within proximity of your address
  • Clothing suitable for placements and facilities
  • Optional field trips
  • DBS checks where not required for compulsory modules
Accommodation and living costs
Accommodation and living costs

Accommodation and living costs are not included in our fees. 

For more information on accommodation and living costs, please see: Accommodation

Sources of financial support

If you receive funding from Student Finance you may be eligible to apply for additional benefits. Details can be obtained by visiting: www.gov.uk

Scholarships and additional funding

As an undergraduate student at Staffordshire, you may be eligible for additional financial support through one of our scholarships and bursaries. You can visit our funding page to find out more and check your eligibility.

Scholarships and additional funding

As an undergraduate student at Staffordshire, you may be eligible for additional financial support through one of our scholarships and bursaries. You can visit our funding page to find out more and check your eligibility.

Scholarships and additional funding

As an undergraduate student at Staffordshire, you may be eligible for additional financial support through one of our scholarships and bursaries. You can visit our funding page to find out more and check your eligibility.

Scholarships and additional funding

As an undergraduate student at Staffordshire, you may be eligible for additional financial support through one of our scholarships and bursaries. You can visit our funding page to find out more and check your eligibility.

Our students

Whilst not only enjoying the course, one of the best parts of Staffordshire is the sense of community, especially in the Psychology department. Staff are approachable and more than helpful - with living away it is important to feel that sense of support both academically and personally.

Staffs has really provided me with the tools to further pursue my career and individual development. I have enjoyed every moment and would recommend the university to anyone.

 

Lauren Spelman

Student, BSc (Hons) Psychology

During the Clearing process, I knew that my first choice of potential universities was Staffordshire University. Throughout the process I had an excellent experience talking to the staff in the Psychology Department, and they made the process so easy and straight forward. The helpfulness of the staff, in addition to the open day confirmed my decision that Staffs was for me.

Following my undergraduate degree, completing the Health Psychology Master’s degree at staffs, the home of health psychology, was an easy decision. The excellent teaching staff, with research and practice experience in various areas of Health Psychology affirmed my choice!

Laurna Bullock

Graduate, BSc (Hons) Psychology

Studying Psychology at Staffordshire University changed my career and lifestyle. The staff were incredibly motivating and gave me a level of confidence that was the foundation to being successful in my Master’s. The course is broad, it covers all areas of the discipline, this is great. It will allow you to find which area is best suited to you. 

Luke Foulser

Graduate, BSc (Hons) Psychology

Studying at Staffordshire University gave me my first opportunity to learn about health psychology and I have never looked back. My passion and dedication to health psychology has surfaced in all the different roles I have had since leaving Staffs, clinical as well as none clinical, and I have been able to keep up with a lot of the new innovative ideas in health promotion as it all stems from health psychology i.e. behaviour change.

 

Fozia Ikram-Bashir

Graduate, BSc (Hons) Psychology

In my first year, I enjoyed my ‘People Behaving Badly’ module, which taught reasoning behind abnormal behaviours. It was interesting to understand why people may behave in a different way. In my second year, I have really enjoyed my ‘Contemporary Issues in Psychology’ module, as it allowed me to see how the knowledge from my lectures and seminars can be applied to real-life scenarios as a Psychologist.

I’d recommend this course to anyone with an interest in psychology, especially if you would like a hands-on experience, as at Staffordshire University, you get practical experiences with the multi-million pound equipment which you can use for your final year project or research throughout your time at Staffordshire University.  

Sophie Jarrett

BSc (Hons) Psychology

I applied for the Psychology degree with Foundation Year in 2019 with the attitude that this would be my “last roll of the career dice”. At the age of 48 I believed that a lot of companies like to employ younger people - this is not always the case but I does not stop me from worrying about it.

My interview with Dr Claire Barlow went really well. She had the ability to dilute my self-doubt and managed to assure me that if I worked hard enough I could achieve great things. I came away from that interview feeling as though I could achieve anything as long as I applied myself.

I am now moving into my second year of study (level 4 at the University). I am going into this year full of confidence and excitement, comfortable in the knowledge that I will be guided and supported throughout my degree. Staffs Uni has given me a new sense of self-belief and I am very excited to see where this wonderful journey will take me.

Phil Bowman

BSc (Hons) Psychology

I would absolutely recommend this course. It's full of interesting topics, you’ll learn so much with so many avenues to consider following it. There is such variety and so many areas for discussion. The foundation year is also a great way of getting back into education, and gives you a great start to your course with the University.

The degree has opened up so many different career options for me to consider and lots of possibilities. I'm now considering teaching Psychology and even the possibility of going all the way and working within the NHS. 

Lisa Kyte

Foundation Year, BSc (Hons) Psychology

The best part of the course has definitely been having the opportunity to make a contribution to psychology research by creating and conducting my own study on a topic that I am interested in. I feel like having the freedom to choose my own research area and collect my own data has been a great experience, and one that will definitely become useful in the future.

I also really enjoyed having the chance to study so many different areas of psychology, including comparative psychology, social psychology, child psychology or neuropsychology. Some of which I have never been aware of before, making the course so much more interesting and unique.

Dominika Rabinska

BSc (Hons) Psychology

I have gained so much more than a degree during my time at Staffs. I worked for the Psychology department as a Psychology Advocate which enabled me to share my passion for psychology with prospective students. I also took two years out during my degree to work at the Students’ Union, which gave me valuable work experience and invaluable life skills. 

 

Jaime-Lee Cunningham

Graduate, BSc (Hons) Psychology

I would recommend the Psychology course to anyone who’s interested. I’m doing single Psychology but whatever aspect of Psychology you’re interested in, there’s a course to suit you.  

Joh Turner

BSc (Hons) Psychology

Apply

Location Award Study option Start date Apply Link
Stoke-on-Trent campus BSc (Hons) Full-time, Stoke-on-Trent campus 19 September 2022 Apply now

Rules and regulations

If you are offered a place at Staffordshire University, your offer will be subject to our rules, regulations and enrolment conditions, which may vary from time to time.

Students of Staffordshire University enter into a contract with us and are bound by these rules and regulations, which are subject to change. For more information, please see: University Policies and Regulations.

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