Transnational Organised Crime

Study options

Award

MA

Key facts

Location:
Stoke-on-Trent campus
Location:
Stoke-on-Trent campus
Study option:
Part-time, distance learning
Study option:
Full-time, distance learning
Duration:
2 Years
Duration:
13 Months
Start date:
26 September 2022

Distance learning

Flexible to fit around work and personal commitments 

World Leading Research

64% of our research outputs for Social Work and Social Policy are rated as "Internationally Excellent" or "World Leading" (Research Excellence Framework 2021)

A tailored course

Meeting your personal or professional interest 

Transnational Organised Crime has become a significant concern and appears to be on the increase. You’ll study contemporary global issues such as drug and human trafficking, international terrorism, illegal arms trading and financial crime through the lens of critical criminology.

You’ll examine the recent emergence of transnational organised crime, its historical precedents at a global level and law enforcement responses. You’ll consider how Transnational Organised Crime is represented by the media.

This course offers valuable insight for a range of careers concerned with Transnational Organised Crime and developing strategies and policies for its prevention. You can enhance your knowledge and career prospects through this qualification.

You’ll study unique topics, taking a critical perspective and work with our experts in sociology and criminology.

Our robust training in research methods will support those wanting to undertake a PhD.

You’ll examine the recent emergence of transnational organised crime, its historical precedents at a global level and law enforcement responses. You’ll consider how Transnational Organised Crime is represented by the media.

This course offers valuable insight for a range of careers concerned with Transnational Organised Crime and developing strategies and policies for its prevention. You can enhance your knowledge and career prospects through this qualification.

You’ll study unique topics, taking a critical perspective and work with our experts in sociology and criminology.

Our robust training in research methods will support those wanting to undertake a PhD.

On successful completion of study, we will issue the following award: MA Transnational Organised Crime

On successful completion of study, we will issue the following award: MA Transnational Organised Crime

Part-time study

If you wish to study this course part-time, the duration of the course is two years. The expected study pattern is to complete modules totalling 180 credits over the two years of study.

Distance learning

The MA in Transnational Organised Crime is a distance learning course and teaching is carried out online. You will not be required to come onto campus to study.

Part-time study

If you wish to study this course part-time, the duration of the course is two years. The expected study pattern is to complete modules totalling 180 credits over the two years of study.

Distance learning

The MA in Transnational Organised Crime is a distance learning course and teaching is carried out online. You will not be required to come onto campus to study.

Work placements

Employability is embedded throughout the course and you’ll have the opportunity to undertake a dissertation project within your place of work or volunteer within an organisation, business or government department relating to the issues covered on the MA course.

Course content

The programme of study has been carefully designed by a team of criminologists into a compelling package of discrete compulsory modules. All the modules make extensive use of a variety of historical and contemporary case studies to illuminate how students might undertake research into this sensitive, controversial and continually evolving subject.

In your first year, you will study 3 modules: Transnational Justice and Organised Crime Researching Crime and Society: Research Design and Data Collection Crimes of the Powerful: Corporate, White Collar and Financial Crime

In your second year, you will complete a postgraduate project in a subject area of your choosing, along with: Trafficking: the illegal trade in people, goods and services Understanding and Tracking Domestic Organised Crime

The programme of study has been carefully designed by a team of criminologists into a compelling package of discrete compulsory modules. All the modules make extensive use of a variety of historical and contemporary case studies to illuminate how students might undertake research into this sensitive, controversial and continually evolving subject.

You will study the following modules across three semesters:

Semester 1:

  • Transnational Justice and Organised Crime
  • Trafficking: the illegal trade in people, goods and services
  • Understanding and Tracking Domestic Organised Crime

Semester 2:

  • Researching Crime and Society
  • Research Design and Data Collection Crimes of the Powerful
  • Corporate, White Collar and Financial Crime

Semester 3:

  • Postgraduate Project

Modules

The tables provide an indicative list of the modules that make up the course for the current academic year. Each module is worth a specified number of credits. Our teaching is informed by research, and modules change periodically to reflect developments in the discipline. We aim to ensure that all modules run as scheduled. If for any reason a module cannot be run we will advise you as soon as possible and will provide guidance on selecting an appropriate alternative module.

Year 1 compulsory modules
Year 1 compulsory modules
Crimes Of The Powerful: White-Collar, Corporate And State Crime 20 credits
Researching Crime And Society 40 credits
Transnational Justice And Organised Crime 20 credits
Year 2 compulsory modules
Year 2 compulsory modules
Postgraduate Project 60 credits
Trafficking Illegal Trade In People Goods And Services 20 credits
Understanding And Tackling Domestic Organised Crime 20 credits

Modules

The tables provide an indicative list of the modules that make up the course for the current academic year. Each module is worth a specified number of credits. Our teaching is informed by research, and modules change periodically to reflect developments in the discipline. We aim to ensure that all modules run as scheduled. If for any reason a module cannot be run we will advise you as soon as possible and will provide guidance on selecting an appropriate alternative module.

Year 1 compulsory modules
Year 1 compulsory modules
Crimes Of The Powerful: White-Collar, Corporate And State Crime 20 credits
Postgraduate Project 60 credits
Researching Crime And Society 40 credits
Trafficking Illegal Trade In People Goods And Services 20 credits
Transnational Justice And Organised Crime 20 credits
Understanding And Tackling Domestic Organised Crime 20 credits

Entry requirements

A 2:2 honours degree or above, or relevant professional experience.

Language level must be at least IELTS 6-6.5 or equivalent. However, you’ll be considered if you have a level of fluency to meet the needs of the course.

 

A 2:2 honours degree or above, or relevant professional experience.

Language level must be at least IELTS 6-6.5 or equivalent. However, you’ll be considered if you have a level of fluency to meet the needs of the course.

 

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For equivalent entry requirements in your home country, please see the information on our country pages.

Choose your country

Check our entry and English language requirements for your country.

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Facilities

Careers

On completion of the Transnational Organised Crime MA, you’ll be equipped to work in a wide range of roles, including:

  • National Crime Agency (NCA) 
  • Armed Forces
  • Policing professions tackling transnational organised crime  
  • Banking sectors tackling financial fraud and compliance, and financial and white-collar crimes 
  • NGOs supporting victims of trafficking 
  • Policy    

Eager for more knowledge? Upon completion, you’ll be ideally placed for further academic study at PhD level. 

All students have access to Career Connect, our dedicated careers team.

Teaching and assessment

Teaching

The bulk of teaching will be delivered via virtual learning. Virtual learning will consist of a 20-minute podcast lecture and PowerPoint slides. You’ll write up weekly tasks in a learning journal which will inform a final piece of assessed coursework. The lecturer will review a sample of journal entries each week and give feedback.

You’ll be able to communicate with staff via email, through face-to-face supervision meetings on campus, telephone calls and skype. This learning provision has been designed to be flexible so you can fit your studies around a full-time job and your personal commitments.

The bulk of teaching will be delivered via virtual learning. Virtual learning will consist of a 20-minute podcast lecture and PowerPoint slides. You’ll write up weekly tasks in a learning journal which will inform a final piece of assessed coursework. The lecturer will review a sample of journal entries each week and give feedback.

You’ll be able to communicate with staff via email, through face-to-face supervision meetings on campus, telephone calls and skype. This learning provision has been designed to be flexible so you can fit your studies around a full-time job and your personal commitments.

Assessment

There are two types of assessments: practice (also called formative) or formal (also called summative).

Practice assessments do not count towards your final mark. These are your chance to test your understanding – and learn how to improve for the real thing.

You’ll have formal assessments at the end of each module. These could include essays, reports, e-posters, e presentations, problem-based assignments or portfolios.

There are two types of assessments: practice (also called formative) or formal (also called summative).

Practice assessments do not count towards your final mark. These are your chance to test your understanding – and learn how to improve for the real thing.

You’ll have formal assessments at the end of each module. These could include essays, reports, e-posters, e presentations, problem-based assignments or portfolios.

Learning support

Your course tutors will provide lots of support. But you can also take advantage of our Academic Skills team, who can help you with: 

  • Study skills (including reading, note-taking and presentation skills) 
  • Written English (including punctuation and grammar) 
  • Academic writing (including how to reference) 
  • Research skills 
  • Critical thinking 
  • Assessment skills (including time management)  

Additional support

If you have additional needs like dyslexia or a sensory impairment, then our Student Inclusion Services are here to help make sure nothing stands in your way.

Feedback

A sample of learning journals will be reviewed each week giving generic feedback about what students are doing well and what things need improving, these will be written up in a course blog.

At the end of each teaching week, the module leader will be online for 20 minutes to discuss the week’s activity. These sessions will be recorded and posted on Blackboard, to provide access to any students who cannot join the virtual session.

A sample of learning journals will be reviewed each week giving generic feedback about what students are doing well and what things need improving, these will be written up in a course blog.

At the end of each teaching week, the module leader will be online for 20 minutes to discuss the week’s activity. These sessions will be recorded and posted on Blackboard, to provide access to any students who cannot join the virtual session.

Independent learning

As well as timetabled sessions, we know it’s important for you to discover things on your own terms. This could involve:  

  • Reading journals, articles and books 
  • Working on projects, alone or in a group 
  • Researching in the library 
  • Preparing coursework 

We’ve invested in state-of-the-art facilities to help you make the most of your private study time. Whether you need a library or a computer, you’ll find it at Staffordshire University.

As well as timetabled sessions, we know it’s important for you to discover things on your own terms. This could involve:  

  • Reading journals, articles and books 
  • Working on projects, alone or in a group 
  • Researching in the library 
  • Preparing coursework 

We’ve invested in state-of-the-art facilities to help you make the most of your private study time. Whether you need a library or a computer, you’ll find it at Staffordshire University.

Staff

You will be taught be dedicated and research active lecturers, whose expertise and knowledge closely match the content of the course. Each of our team has a PhD, or is working towards one, and all are members of the Higher Education Authority. Each of our team has extensive contacts within the Criminal Justice System and/or local community partnerships.

Grace Gallacher

Lecturer

Grace is a lecturer in criminology. Her research interests include contemporary critical criminological theory and how this can be applied to children and the evolution of childhood, social media in the post pandemic era and sports criminology.

Grace's profile

Dr Emma Temple-Malt

Course Director

Em is the Course leader for the PG Transnational Organised Crime Masters,, Sociology and Social Justice Masters and Criminology and Criminal Justice Masters. Her expertise are in domestic abuse education and research methodology.

Emma's profile

Dr Luke Telford

Lecturer

Luke is a Lecturer in Criminology, having recently finished his ESRC funded PhD on working class nationalism in a deindustrialised and relatively deprived locality.

Luke's profile

Sarah Page

Senior Lecturer

Sarah Page is a Senior Lecturer for the undergraduate and postgraduate Criminology degrees, as well as the Action on Poverty and Hardship undergraduate degree.

Sarah's profile

Professor James Treadwell

Professor In Criminology

James became a Professor in Criminology at Staffordshire University in 2017. His expertise are in violent, professional and organised crime; prisons, prison violence and victimisation; drugs and crime; Ethnography; Crime and the Military.

James's profile

Louis Martin

Senior Lecturer

Louis worked for Derbyshire Constabulary before becoming Head of the Roads Policing Unit and Detective Inspector for Derby City Centre. He is Course Leader for Criminal Justice with Offender Management.

Louis's profile

Dr Mark Bushell

Lecturer

Mark is a lecturer in Criminology in the School of Justice, Security and Sustainability. He has active research interests in the night-time economy, 21st century cultures of work, violence, and social harm.

Mark's profile

Dr Arta Jalili-Idrissi

Lecturer

Arta is a critical criminologist and Lecturer in Criminology at Staffordshire University. Arta's main areas of interest are imprisonment, carceral space and technology, penalty and social control.

Arta's profile

Fees

For the course starting on 26 September 2022 the tuition fees are:

Tuition fees for MA-Part-time, distance learning
Study option UK / Channel Islands International
Part-time £8,235 per course £8,235 per course

For the course starting on 26 September 2022 the tuition fees are:

Tuition fees for MA Full-time, distance learning
Study option UK / Channel Islands International
Full-time £8,245 per course £8,245 per course

If you would like to know more about the fees listed and what this means to you then please get in touch with our Enquiries Team.

Alumni discount

If you have previously completed an undergraduate degree with us, you may be entitled to an alumni discount off your course fee for any subsequent postgraduate taught course. For further information please contact feesandbursaries@staffs.ac.uk.

Included in tuition fees
Included in the fees:
Not included in tuition fees
Not included in the fees:
  • Text books are available from the library and online resources, but some students choose to purchase their own copies.
  • Printing
  • Travel costs
  • Any optional field trips
  • Text books are available from the library and online resources, but some students choose to purchase their own copies.
  • Printing
  • Travel costs
  • Any optional field trips
Accommodation and living costs
Accommodation and living costs

Accommodation and living costs are not included in our fees. 

For more information on accommodation and living costs, please see: Accommodation

Sources of financial support

Providing you are studying towards a full Masters qualification you may be able to apply for a postgraduate loan of up to £11,570 to help with tuition fees, maintenance and other associated costs. Student loans are available for many of our postgraduate degrees and are provided by the Student Loans Company (SLC). The loan can cover a wide range of postgraduate study options; part-time, full-time and distance learning. 

For more information and how to apply visit masters loan.

Apply

Location Award Study option Start date Apply Link
Stoke-on-Trent campus MA Part-time, distance learning 26 September 2022 Apply now

Rules and regulations

If you are offered a place at Staffordshire University, your offer will be subject to our rules, regulations and enrolment conditions, which may vary from time to time.

Students of Staffordshire University enter into a contract with us and are bound by these rules and regulations, which are subject to change. For more information, please see: University Policies and Regulations

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